The economic impact of the emigration that had happened before the construction

The economic impact of the emigration that had

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The economic impact of the emigration that had happened before the construction of the wall proved to be worse than initially anticipated. There was however a reverse effect of the construction of the wall to West Germany (Milanovic, 2013). With a booming increase in the number of working population and also the literate population; West Germany had what it takes to have a skyrocketing economy. The economic gap between West Germany and East Germany widened with the years. The economic policies of socialism also seemed not to work for East Germany. The capitalist West Germany on the other hand was the opposite. The capitalist economic policy that they chose to follow resulted in a positive economic growth for Germany. To date, the economic difference between the western part of Germany and the Eastern part of Germany are still noticeable despite huge effort put by the federal government of Germany to try to boost eastern part of Germany economically so that they can level the western part of Germany. Political Impact The construction of the wall served to increase the political factions between the U.S.S.R and the other three Allied powers (Marsh, 2004). The United States condemned the construction of the wall and took the opportunity to paint the Soviet Union in a bad way for constructing a wall that restricts movement of people that was largely seen as infringement of basic human rights.
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Surname7 The two had experienced differences before when the United States had condemned the Soviet invasion of Cuba (Fred, 2006). This had partly contributed to the building of the wall because the Soviet leader felt aggrieved and therefore decided to erect a wall to cut West Germany where United States and other Allied powers had control over from Berlin Conclusion Erecting of the wall of Berlin might have been envisioned by the Soviets as any other way of settling one’s factions with an enemy country. Whatever the intentions, the wall eventually had huge economic, political and social and even historical impact on Germany and even other parts of the world. This can be evidenced to date by the fact that eastern part of Germany has never caught up economically with the western part of the country (Marsh, 2004). As of now, it serves as a checkpoint for political forces that might want to engage in division of a country by using a physical barrier of what the consequences might be.
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Surname8 Works Cited Baker, James Addison, and Thomas M. DeFrank. The politics of diplomacy . New York: GP Putnam, 1995. Gundle, Stephen, and Simon Parker, eds. The new Italian Republic: from the fall of the Berlin Wall to Berlusconi . Routledge, 2002. Taylor, Fred. The Berlin Wall: a world divided, 1961-1989 . New York: HarperCollins, 2006. Lakner, Christoph, and Branko Milanovic. Global income distribution: from the fall of the Berlin Wall to the Great Recession . The World Bank, 2013. Ahlfeldt, Gabriel M., et al. "The economics of density: Evidence from the Berlin Wall." Econometrica 83.6 (2015): 2127-2189. Wyden, Peter. Wall: the inside story of divided Berlin . Simon & Schuster, 1989. Marsh, Herbert W., and Olaf Köller. "Unification of theoretical models of academic self- concept/achievement relations: Reunification of east and west German school systems after the fall of the Berlin Wall." Contemporary Educational Psychology 29.3 (2004): 264-282.
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