Was presented in the videos misrepresents this fact

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was presented in the videos misrepresents this fact, making it seem as if Hijras commonly work for the government, which would be considered a prestigious job. In “Seatbelt Crew”, the wording would lead one to believe that al hijras are transgender, but this is false. Additionally, the video states that they receive money for their roadside blessings as their status is valued in India, allowing them to earn their keep. It’s not mentioned however that people give money and pay their taxes (pertaining to “Tax Collectors”) to make the Hijras go away as they find it undesirable to interact with Hijras or have the Hijras at their door. In that case, the government, in hiring the Hijras is directly exploiting the public’s aversion and discrimination of the Hijra community. Both videos seem to undermine and refuse to acknowledge the discrimination that the Hijra community face. The tone used directly seems to contradict this very fact and is disrespectful to the Hijra community, even though the content of the videos would argue differently. In general, I feel like the videos are more a form of propaganda, using Hijras to make a point out of an entirely different subject rather than actually speaking for their sake. 3-10 Feminist and Womanist Theologies Question for Forum Response: Do you see any themes or beliefs that connect across the feminist/womanist theologies we have encountered? What do you make of their theological responses to particular socio-political contexts? Black women experience oppression and inequality disproportionately more than other marginalized groups. This issue prevails due to black women being rendered invisible and are underrepresented. This is made evident by racial violence, which isn’t only inflicted against black men, but black women as well, but it’s not frequently mentioned and there’s little awareness. A racialized image is attached to black women and they have a reputation of being accessories to crime or being named “Welfare Queen”, but society fails to address the underlying circumstances. These stereotypes have played a big factor in black women getting the short end of the stick in the ‘system’. Day emphasizes the importance of the need for structural change as too much focus is put on structure that the individual and their circumstances are ignored. Rather than shifting blame towards black women as society as tends to do, womanist theology focuses on reshaping and questioning societal norms that have made it okay to treat black women as such. The force that was responsible for this is Neoliberalism. A theme in the podcast found in womanist theologies is applying the principle of ‘love’ towards others to counteract neoliberalism. As it states in the lecture, love can be extended to form “political communities sustained by emotions”. That is a start towards helping black women live a life of empowerment so that they can live in a society that values the lives of black women. They should be able to have confidence that Christianity is inclusive of black women. White

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