the whole child adjust activities to accommodate the needs of individual

The whole child adjust activities to accommodate the

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the “whole child”, adjust activities to accommodate the needs of individual children, including children with special needs and children who are English language learners, communicate to others about instruction, evaluate children’s learning, assess the effectiveness of their instruction, and continuously improve their teaching (Kostelnik, Soderman, Whiren, & Rupiper, 2015). The steps of intentional planning were evident in the lesson that I chose “Making Playdough”. According to the statement above the teacher had her thoughts and actions organized. It was clear and easy for the students to understand. The teacher had all the materials and equipment in advance, she had all ingredients for playdough. Although, most of her students
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are Hispanic, she includes English and Spanish vocabulary so that all her students will that will develop language skills. The teacher's goals and objectives for the students were clear. When all the ingredients were in the mixing bowl she allowed her students to mix with their hands so they can feel the different textures “I want everybody to squeeze it and feel the texture” ( Teaching Channel, n.d.). This is very beneficial for intentional teaching, letting the students engage and experience hands on activity. After the play dough was made, she encourages her students to play in the play dough that they made. “After we made the play dough, we put it on the table and then from there, we put some tools in there, like letters, shapes, so that they could use their creativity to do whatever they want” ( Teaching Channel, n.d.). The intentional planning of the lesson was a successful for the teacher as well as, beneficial for the children. The lesson is developmentally appropriate for pre-k children in the group because it promotes children learning and development. Making playdough is rolling, squishing, molding and more. Children enjoy making and playing with playdough. Playdough allows children to use their imaginations, pretend play and make believe. It also strengthens the small muscles in their fingers. Using playdough “supports your child’s social skills such as sharing, taking turns, and enjoying being with other people and playdough also encourages children’s language and literacy, science, and math skills” (NAEYC, n.d). When children use playdough, they explore ideas and try different approaches until they find one that works. They compare objects and their experimenting, children come up with their own ideas, satisfy their curiosity, and analyze and solve problems (NAEYC, n.d). Making playdough is developmentally appropriate because it builds social and emotional development, language and literacy, science, math, and physical development skills. Making playdough also provides children with the opportunity to have hands on experiences and promotes eye-hand coordination. The teacher also allowed her students to develop numerous of skills throughout her lesson. She allowed her students to pour in the
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ingredients in the mixing bowl to strengthen their eye/hand coordination. All these skills are
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