A good phonics program would include Helps students apply what they learn about

A good phonics program would include helps students

This preview shows page 7 - 9 out of 13 pages.

A good phonics program would include: Helps students apply what they learn about sounds and letters to their own writing. ( PRF p. 13 ) ( PRF p. 16-18) A good phonics program would include: Can be adapted to the needs of individual students, based on assessment. ( PRF p. 13 ) ( PRF p. 16-18) A good phonics program would include: Includes alphabetic knowledge, phonemic awareness, vocabulary development and the reading of text as well as systematic phonics instruction. Progression of phonics instruction 1st- Word awareness- tracking the words in sentences 2nd- Responsiveness to rhyme and alliteration 3rd-syllable awareness=counting, tapping, blending or segmenting a word into syllables Progression of phonics instruction part 2- 4th Onset and Rime manipulation- ability to produce a rhyming word depends on understanding that rhyming words have the same rime. Recognizing is much easier than producing a rhyme. Phoneme awareness- Progression of phonics instruction part 3- Phoneme awareness: Identify and match the initial sounds in words, then final and mid. -Segment and produce the initial sound then the final and middle sound. -blend sounds into words- segment the phonemes in two or 3 sound words moving to 4 and 5 sound words as student becomes proficient. - Manipulate phonemes by removing, adding or substituting sound. What is a phoneme A phoneme is the smallest part of SPOKEN language that makes a difference in the meaning of words. eg: Hat change the c for the h and you have cat. English has about 41 phonemes. oh and a only have 1 phoneme. Check has 3 phonemes. Sometimes a phoneme is represented by more than one letter (PRF p. 4) What is a grapheme? A grapheme is the smallest part of WRITTEN language that represents a phoneme in the spelling of a word. A grapheme may be just one letter such as b, f, p, s. or several letters, such as ch, sh, th ck, ea and igh (PRF p. 4) Six Syllable types- open, closed, VCe, vowel teams, r-controlled, consonant-le, 1. closed syllable (CVC): ends in at least one consonant; vowel is short (one vowel) [mag/net, pump/kin, at] 2. open syllable (CV): ends in one vowel; vowel is long [no, be, me, BA/con] 3. vowel-consonant-e (VCe or CVCe): ends in one vowel, one consonant, and a final e. Final e is silent and the vowel is usually long [cake, man/DATE] 4. vowel +r syllable: has an r after the vowel, vowel makes an unexpected sound [car, star, bird, fern]
Image of page 7
5. vowel pair syllable: has two adjacent vowels. each vowel pair syllable must be learned individually [tea, bee, teach] 6. final stable syllable Why teach syllables? Knowing the syllable types helps readers know whether a vowel is long, short, a dipthong, r controlled or whether endings have been added. Six Syllable types acronym CLOVER C-closed, L for le (ending), o for open (long vowel at end of syllable) v for vowel pair eg:teacup (two vowels go walking), e for magic/silent e, and r for r controlled.
Image of page 8
Image of page 9

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture