next-generation-sample-questions-quantitative-reasoning.pdf

15 1 b 125 c 15 d 125 11 jacoby followed a recipe

Info icon This preview shows pages 4–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
15 1 B. 125 C. –15 D. –125 11. Jacoby followed a recipe that requires 2 cups of water for every 3 cups of four. If he used 8 cups of four, how many cups of water did he use? 2 A. 2 3 B. 4 1 C. 5 3 D. 12 16. W hich of the following expressions is equivalent to ( x 3 . x 2 ) 5 ? A. x 10 B. x 15 C. x 25 D. x 30 12. 4( x + 5) + 4 x + 8 Which of the following is equivalent to the expression above? A. 4(2 x + 7) B. 8( x + 4) C. 5 x + 17 D. 8 x + 13
Image of page 4

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Quantitative Reasoning, Algebra, and Statistics © 2017 The College Board. 17. Te elevation at the summit of Mount Whitney is 4,418 meters above sea level. Climbers begin at a trailhead that has an elevation of 2,550 meters above sea level. What is the change in elevation, to the nearest foot, between the trailhead and the summit? (1 foot = 0.3048 meters) A. 569 feet B. 5,604 feet C. 6,129 feet D. 14,495 feet 18. 3 x – 2 y = 15 x = 3 Te two lines given by the equations above intersect in the xy -plane. What is the value of the y -coordinate of the point of intersection? A. –7 B. –3 C. 3 D. 7 19. L = {0, 20, 40, 80, 100} M = {5, 10, 15, 20, 25} N = {10, 20, 30, 40, 50} Sets L , M , and N are shown above. Which of the following sets represents L ( M N ) (the union of L with the intersection of sets M and N )? A. {0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, 80, 100} B. {0, 10, 20, 40, 80, 100} C. {20, 40} D. {20} 20. y R P Q O x Triangle PQR lies in the xy -plane, and the coordinates of vertex Q are (2, –3). Triangle PQR is rotated 180° clockwise about the origin and then refected across the y -axis to produce triangle P Q R , where vertex Q corresponds to vertex Q of triangle PQR . What are the coordinates of Q ? A. (–3, –2) B. (3, –2) C. (–2, 3) D. (2, 3) 4
Image of page 5
ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Quantitative Reasoning, Algebra, and Statistics © 2017 The College Board. Answer Key 1. D 2. C 3. D 4. A 5. A 6. D 7. C 8. B 9. B 10. A 11. C 12. A 13. D 14. C 15. B 16. C 17. C 18. B 19. B 20. D 5
Image of page 6

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Quantitative Reasoning, Algebra, and Statistics © 2017 The College Board. 6 Rationales 1. Choice D is correct. The order of operations was used properly to write the expression. The sum of r and s in parentheses is found first, then multiplication is used to find the number that is 5 times the sum of r and s . Choice A is incorrect because this is the sum of s and 5 times as much as r . Choice B is incorrect because this is the sum of 5 , r , and s . Choice C is incorrect because this is the sum of r and 5 times as much as s . 2. Choice C is correct. The equation 1 3 1 x + ( x + 1) - = 5 2 2 4 can be rewritten as 1 3 3 1 x + x + - = 5 2 2 2 4 1 3 15 2 x = 5 + - = 4 2 4 , which simplifies to . 15 15 x = ÷ 2 = 4 8 Therefore, . . Choice A is incorrect because if x were equal to , 5 2 , then 1 3 1 x + ( x + 1) - 2 2 4 would equal 1 2 ( 5 2 ) 3 + 2 ( 5 + 1 2 ) 1 - 4 , , which is equal to 25 4 , not 5 . Choice B is incorrect because if x were equal to 13 , , then 1 3 1 x + ( x + 1) - 2 2 4 8 would equal 1 13 3 13 1 ( ) + ( + 1 8 ) - 2 8 2 4 , which is equal to 9 , , not 5 . Choice D is 2 incorrect because if x were equal to 17 8 , then 1 3 1 x + ( x + 1) - 2 2 4 would equal 1 ( 17 ) 3 17 1 + ( + 1 8 ) - 2 8 2 4 , which is equal to 11 2 , not 5 .
Image of page 7
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern