ch07

Psychology in Action

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Instructor’s Resource Guide Chapter 7            Page   235
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Some names, like Sandy Storm, are easily visualized. However, you can also use this system with more common names, like “Brewster.” Ask yourself, “Are there any words I can visualize that sound like the name?” If not, break the name into parts and imagine substitutes for them. For example, for the name “Brewster,” substitute the word “rooster” or divide it into “brew” and “stir.” With “rooster,” imagine a big rooster with the facial features of the person named “Brewster.” For “brew” and “stir,” you might visualize a large mug of beer being stirred by an oar. Each of the images you choose should be absurd, exaggerated, or as distinctive as possible. The idea is to form a lasting image. For practice, use the substitute word system and create corresponding vivid images for the following names: George Washington, Plato, Pearl Bailey, Heather Locklear, and Ricky Martin. Critical Exercise 7.4 - Gathering Data (A Behavioral Skill) Collecting up-to-date, relevant information is an important component of critical thinking. To help build this skill, as well as to gain important insights into memory strategies, try the following: a. Interview three classmates who do well on exams and that you believe have good memories. Ask about their study techniques and test taking strategies. Using the examples found in Appendix B of this study guide, ask which technique they find most useful? Now interview three classmates or friends who complain about their college grades and poor memories. Compare their study techniques and test taking strategies to those who remember well. What are the differences? b. Interview three people who have taken a reading improvement or speed-reading course. What methods were taught that increased reading speed and comprehension? What changes have they noticed in their college grades or exam performances since taking the course? Did they use any of the techniques or mnemonics discussed in the text?   G ender and C ultural D iversity Instructor’s Resource Guide Chapter 7            Page   236
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Gender and Cultural Diversity Activity 7.1 - Oral Tradition and Narrative Objective: To determine how oral-tradition cultures affect memory strategies as compared to memory strategies of cultures using written materials. Materials: Invite an individual from Native American studies to speak of his or her oral tradition. (Audiotapes of such narratives may be substituted if you cannot arrange a speaker.) Procedure: Inform your students that a guest speaker will be visiting the class. This speaker will be a storyteller, and they will have the opportunity to both listen to the stories and question the speaker on the memory strategies employed in the process of learning and reciting the narrative.
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