Now each of the hairs has the same positive charge Things with the same charge

Now each of the hairs has the same positive charge

This preview shows page 5 - 8 out of 15 pages.

Now each of the hairs has the same positive charge. Things with the same charge repel each other. So the hairs try to move away from each other. The farthest they can get is to stand up and away from all the other hairs. If you walk across a carpet, electrons move from the rug to you. Now you have extra electrons. Touch a door knob and ZAP! The electrons move from you to the knob. You get a shock. Question 1 What does it mean for an object to have an electric charge? Give an example of an object receiving an electric charge, and describe how that charged object might behave. Question 2 How many electrons are contained in one coulomb of charge? Question 3 Now let’s try how much you learn!answer this activity activi
Image of page 5

Subscribe to view the full document.

What is happening when two objects are rubbed together and static electricity results? Question 44 4 How many electrons are there in 2 × 10 5 coulombs of charge? Determine the answer without using a calculator, and express the answer in scientific notation! Question 55 5 If a positive charge is forcibly moved closer to another positive charge, mechanical work must be performed. This is analogous to compressing a spring: work must be done to cause motion against the natural repulsion of the system: This mechanical work becomes stored in the electric field between the charges, and is a form of potential energy. This, again, is similar to a mechanical spring, where the work done in compressing a spring is stored as potential energy in its compressed state. Define voltage in terms of the change in potential energy resulting from this forceful motion of the charge, the way a physicist would. Question 1 For an object to be electrically charged, it must have either a surplus or a deficit of electrons among its atoms. Ans. To
Image of page 6
A common example of electrically charging objects is rubbing latex balloons against wool clothing, or brushing your hair with a plastic comb. The consequences of these electric charges are very easy to perceive! Question 2 There are 6.25 × 1018 electrons in one coulomb of charge. What would this appear as without the use of scientific notation? Write this same figure using the most appropriate metric prefix. Question 3 When certain combinations of materials are rubbed together, the rubbing action transfer electrons from the atoms of one material to the atoms of the other. This imbalance of electrons leaves the former material with a positive
Image of page 7

Subscribe to view the full document.

Image of page 8
  • Summer '19
  • renalyn delima
  • Atom, Electric charge

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern

Ask Expert Tutors You can ask 0 bonus questions You can ask 0 questions (0 expire soon) You can ask 0 questions (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes