This is one way in which cyberterrorism may be

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cyberterrorism than less industrialized societies. This is one way in which cyberterrorism may be understood as a form of asymmetric warfare: the cost of disruption of cyberspace is greater to advanced societies. This asymmetry may make international cooperation more difficult. Not all networks are, or must be, attached to the internet, and all networks are not alike in susceptibility to attack or attractiveness as a target. It is important to distinguish the different types of networks that may be subjected to attack. ° First are military and civilian defense networks. These networks must be hardened against the most aggressive attack, whether in realspace or cyberspace. On the other hand, these networks are eligible for seclusion or quarantine in a way that may make them far less susceptible to attack. ° Second are other governmental networks, including networks for emergency response, police, fire, health, traffic control and other critical governmental service networks. These networks may utilize the public internet or may utilize separate facilities, but they also may be separated from the public internet. ° Third are privately or publicly owned networks used to control public utilities and other systems for providing infrastructural services or goods. These include networks that control provision of electricity, oil and gas, water, food, financial services, communication services, and medical services. ° Fourth are public networks used by individual consumers and businesses for communication, education, shopping and other less directly critical activities. The more protection is concentrated in the highest value targets, the greater the threat to the lower value targets. This is a paradox of terrorism generally: when military targets are hardened, civilian targets become more attractive; when airlines have impenetrable security, terrorists attack trains. So it is difficult to rely on distinctions among targets in terms of their relative attractiveness. This paradox also means that increasing target-specific protection creates increasing need for protection, as additional targets become relevant. Nevertheless, different types of networks will vary in terms of their attractiveness as targets, the costs, including opportunity costs, of protecting them, and the ease with which they may be attacked. ii. Type of attack
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Global Cyberterrorism, Jurisdiction, and International Organization 6 This paper is not a technical treatment of the risks of cyberterrorism, but for expositional purposes, it is useful to briefly list the types of cyberspace methods available to the cyberterrorist. Cyberterrorists may disrupt networks through malevolent software (“malware”) attacks known as worms, viruses, Trojan horses, etc. These software attacks work on individual computers. Cyberterrorists can target particular sites through “distributed denial of service” (DDOS) attacks, which seek to overload sites.
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