3 Preparing master files and printing copies of templates and macros The

3 preparing master files and printing copies of

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4.3 Preparing master files and printing copies of templates and macros The templates you create for your office administration system should be used in a consistent and reliable manner, otherwise there may be a breakdown in the integrity of the document and a loss of confidence in its use. To maintain the robustness of the document, a master file must be created. This avoids the risk of unauthorised alterations and maintains the standards and layout you originally intended. Producing a master file A master file is a record containing all the criteria required by the originator and is contained on a relatively permanent basis in the organisations information system. The master file should be: Password protected: Alterations should not be permitted by anyone other than those authorised to do so. A password can usually be allocated to a file depending on the system you use. Alternatively, document templates may be protected using common software add- ins or existing file protection macros, such as MS Word’s ‘protect document’ function. System passwords should also be shared with IT personnel in the event that the originator is not available. Formatted: The master file should be formatted and styled in the way intended for ongoing use. That means the fonts, fields, macros and titles should all match the organisation’s intended design criteria. Available: The master file needs to be accessible for those who need to use it. Burying it deep in some complex filing system is unproductive and frustrating for those who may use it regularly. Shortcuts or html links directly to the file may be appropriate. Most medium to large organisations should have a policy or procedure that provides guidelines for the creation of a master file. These organisations usually run information management systems from central servers and require all master files to reside on a designated file server or web server. Naming conventions Master file types vary between systems. File extensions; that is, the file type that is allocated to a template or master file, can include: *.master - this extension type is used for html-based files; those created for web forms only *.dot or *.dotx - this Microsoft extension type is used for Word templates. The extension may change if the document is published to the web *.xlt or *.xtlx - Microsoft Excel templates are commonly employed as document templates for data entry
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BSBADM506 Page | 66 *. adn, * .accdt, *.mdt, or *.adnx - Microsoft Access is also a regularly used database suite with forms and designs often circulated through organisations. Remember that extensions are dependent on the system you are using. These are provided to highlight that the extension indicates that the file has been saved as a template, rather than an editable document.
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