The London Times report detailing the coincidence of AIDS and the WHOs

The london times report detailing the coincidence of

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counterhistory, they are typically treated as "evidence" of a white cover-up. The London Times report detailing thecoincidence of AIDS and the WHO's vaccination campaign in Africa pointedly includes the statement that "no blame can be attached to the WHO." When Zears Miles reads this out over the radio, Kantako's laughter is both delighted and skeptical. The lack of direct evidence of the WHO's intention to spread AIDS may indicate either that the intention did not exist or that it has been successfully hidden. Black Liberation Radio has no doubts about its position in this dilemma. Interpretation depends upon the construction of relationships. Events, objects, statements do not carry their own meaning but are made to mean by the relations in which they are involved. I am here referring to the double process of articulation that Stuart Hall identifies as central to the making of meaning in "On Postmodernism..." The one side of articulation is a process of flexible linking while the other is that of speaking or of disseminating the meaning that is produced by the linkage. The fact that white civilian hospitals use Black bodies for research may be linked to medical science, in which case, the Blackness of the bodies does not mean anything; or, on the other hand, it may be linkedto the Chemical and Biological Warfare Department's search for an "ethnic weapon," in which case, it means everything. For instance, one of the "facts" of the Tuskegee experiment was the observation that Blacks appeared to be more susceptible than whites to syphilis, and there was interest in discovering if this was the case, and if so, why. Articulated with and in the humane discourse of medicine, this "interest" easily leads to the conclusion that such a physiological difference could be used to devise treatments for Blacks and, thus, minimize the relative difference in the health of Blacks and whites.However, when this is articulated with the facts that "health differences" between whites and Blacks are increasing, not decreasing-the differential spread of AIDS is joined, for example, by differences in life expectancy, infant mortality, and hypertension-and when theselinked "facts" are articulated within a knowledge of genocidal strategy, the original "fact" means something very different. Facts never exist independently or in isolation but rather in articulation with others. Their very facticity is a function and product of their discursive relations. Reusing them, therefore, involves disarticulating them from one set of relations and rearticulating them into another.They are never simply inert, like pebbles on a beach, waiting to be picked up by whoever finds them first. While no fact has any essential existence or meaning of its own, it always has the potential for dis- and rearticulation. Evaluating a fact's significance, which always involves assessing both how much it matters and what it means, is, thus, a matter of evaluating its potential articulations, their social location and pattern of interests, and their predicted or interpreted effectivity. The constitution of a historical fact is an
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