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These two 2 components are always presented in the

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  These two (2) components are always presented in the following notation:   Strike: N (degrees< 90 o ) E or W Where: Degrees measurement refers to the degrees deviating from north Direction (E or W) refers to the direction it is deviating towards Dip: (degrees< 90 o ) direction | to strike Where: Degrees measurement refers to the degrees from horizontal ground surface trending into the earth Direction is always perpendicular to strike direction *This system is always written in the shorthand notation as above. Example: N 25 o E, 13 o NW means that the horizontal trend is 25 degrees east of north (strike) and dips 13 degrees from the horizontal into the earth (dip).
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Key Terminology Key Terminology Deformation Stress Strain Extension Compression Shearing Ductile Brittle Anticline Syncline Dome Basin Joint Fault Normal fault Reverse fault Dip-slip fault Strike-slip fault Right-lateral strike-slip fault Left-lateral strike-slip fault Strike Dip Attitude
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Pertinent Web Sites Pertinent Web Sites Active Tectonics Web Server The Active Tectonics Web Server was established in order to effectively disseminate ideas resulting from the Active Tectonics initiative. Fault Animations Excellent animations of faults, plate subduction, earthquake wave propagation, and other processes from PBS' Savage Earth program. Folds, Faults, and Mountain Links (Houghton Mifflin) Links to several folds, faults, and mountain building sites, including class lecture notes, arranged by topic. Geology Search Gallery The University of British Columbia Image Gallery contains images related to the earth and ocean sciences, including some specialized subsets (e.g., Lithoprobe, Structural Geology).
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