3 or reference 3 except at the beginning of a sentence Reference 3 shows Number

3 or reference 3 except at the beginning of a

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[3]” or “reference [3]” except at the beginning of a sentence: “Reference [3] shows ... .” Number footnotes separately in superscripts (Insert | Footnote). 1 Place the actual footnote at the bottom of the column in which it is cited; do not put footnotes in the reference list (endnotes). Use letters for table footnotes (see Table I). Please note that the references at the end of this document are in the preferred referencing style. Give all authors’ names; do not use “ et al .” unless there are six authors or more. Use a space after authors' initials. Papers that have not been published should be cited as “unpublished” [4]. Papers that have been submitted for publication should be cited as “submitted for publication” [5]. Papers that have been accepted for publication, but not yet specified for an issue should be cited as “to be published” [6]. Please give affiliations and addresses for private communications [7]. Capitalize only the first word in a paper title, except for proper nouns and element symbols. For papers published in translation journals, please give the English citation first, followed by the original foreign-language citation [8]. C.Abbreviations and Acronyms Define abbreviations and acronyms the first time they are used in the text, even after they have already been defined in the abstract. Abbreviations such as SI, ac, and dc do not have to be defined. Abbreviations that incorporate periods should not have spaces: write “C.N.R.S.,” not “C. N. R. S.” Do not use abbreviations in the title unless they are unavoidable (for example, “Journal Name” in the title of this article). D.Equations Number equations consecutively with equation numbers in parentheses flush with the right margin, as in (1). First use the equation editor to create the equation. Then select 1 the “Equation” markup style. Press the tab key and write the equation number in parentheses. To make your equations more compact, you may use the solidus ( / ), the exp function, or appropriate exponents. Use parentheses to avoid ambiguities in denominators. Punctuate equations when they are part of a sentence, as in . ) ( ) ( ) | | ( exp )] 2 ( / [ ) , ( 0 2 1 1 0 0 2 0 2 d r J r J z z r d dr r F i i j r (1) Be sure that the symbols in your equation have been defined before the equation appears or immediately following. Italicize symbols ( T might refer to temperature, but T is the unit tesla). Refer to “(1),” not “Eq. (1)” or “equation (1),” except at the beginning of a sentence: “Equation (1) is ... .” E.Other Recommendations Use one space after periods and colons. Hyphenate complex modifiers: “zero-field-cooled magnetization.” Avoid dangling participles, such as, “Using (1), the potential was calculated.” [It is not clear who or what used (1).] Write instead, “The potential was calculated by using (1),” or “Using (1), we calculated the potential.” Use a zero before decimal points: “0.25,” not “.25.” Use “cm 3 ,” not “cc.” Indicate sample dimensions as “0.1 cm 0.2 cm,” not “0.1 0.2 cm 2 .” The abbreviation for “seconds” is “s,” not “sec.” Do not mix complete spellings
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