There are negative aspects to flexible work

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There are negative aspects to flexible work agreements that may come into play and must be monitored closer if there are issues when it comes to work performance. Some employers encounter problems with making alternative solutions work, which include, employee training, monitoring productivity and outputs, performance evaluation, and lines of open communication. Another area that is quite common among the different generations is the perception of traditional managers or leaders being uncomfortable with anything but the traditional “9 to 5” workday. According to Brookins, “Whether working from home or working a compressed schedule, employees often face issues with family, friends and co-workers who aren't entirely familiar with flexible work schedules. Friends and family may question whether the employee has a serious job and co-workers might be envious of flexible conditions that they don’t have” (Brookins, Chron.com). Other negatives might be related to finding adequate child care around flex scheduling, or if employees are working a compressed work week they might burn out more quickly. Another watch out for employers who are doing alternative work arrangements is to ensure customer or service needs are being met with availability of employees. If employees are taking time or flex scheduling they might not be meeting times when customers need them most. Companies should know upfront how and when flex scheduling will work and won’t when hiring new employees. Overall the benefits outweigh the negatives when it comes to alternative work arrangements. Employers are being influenced easily about work arrangements as its being ranked one of the top requirements when finding a job, especially with the newer generations. Work life balance is important, and people do not want to give up home or personal life to be watched by the clock or have to be chained to a desk. Employers are influenced to turning to alternative work arrangements as they are starting to lose bidding on highly qualified candidates
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Case Study 3: Alternative Work Arrangements 5 if they don’t have them. A few things driving changes and influencing employers to take on more alternative work agreements are “parents who want more time with family, students who are trying to fit in their class scheduling, and the older “baby boomer” generation working after retirement” (McCuddy, Louis, Morgal, p. 6). Overall people are looking for more fulfilling jobs that are going to meet all of their needs of career path, as well as, a better match for their personal lives.
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  • Spring '10
  • DR.NEPTUNE
  • Case Study, Alternative Work Arrangements

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