When the federal government did not and could not do

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When the Federal Government did not and could not do much to stop nullification in the North, Southerners began to claim that the Union no longer represented them and as such, it was the responsibility of those in the Republic to reject the leadership that did not represent them. Remember Republicanism, one of the most important characteristics of Republicanism and really the sole job of the citizenry. You have two jobs as a citizen in the US; select your government so that they represent you and to reject that government if they do not represent you any longer, if they are not a part of who you are, if they don’t represent your ideals. With Republicanism, individuals had the inherent right to reject a government that did not represent them. For the South, the only way to reject the government that did not represent them was through secession. This was because the South and their fears will believe that they had become a permanent minority in the Federal endeavour. Kansas-nebraska act 1854 The Second Cause to the Compromise of 1850 and the stability of the Union was the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854. Steven Douglas While both regions were still battling it out over the Fugitive Slave Laws, Steven Douglas introduced the Kansas-Nebraska Act as a way to get support from both the North and the South for the upcoming presidential election. Douglas wanted to be the President and he believed that he would be a sure winner if the Kansas-Nebraska Act passed. Kansas-Nebraska Act. What was the Kansas-Nebraska Act? The act itself proposed that the region referred to as Indian country be opened up for white settlement after of course American-Indians were removed and negating any and all treaties with American Indians in that territory. Under the political ideal of popular sovereignty . He wanted to do this because he wanted to build a transcontinental railroad that would run from Chicago to the Pacific Coast.
In order to do this, you have to build it through Indian territory (in picture: later to be termed the Kansas-Nebraska territory). To get from Illinois to the Pacific Coast we had to go through the Indian country and in order to lay the transcontinental railroad we had to go straight through Indian territory. Popular Sovereignty meant that those living in the different regions or organizing the territory for statehood would decide whether or not slavery would exist in that area. Douglas believed that Northerners would support the act because of the economic benefit that it would see because of the transcontinental railroad. If we get to the Pacific coast with the railroad, Northern industrialists would be able to tap into two markets; 1. The ever growing domestic market and 2. The Pacific rim (China and other countries). If we can get to the Pacific Coast, it’s a good staging area for trade off continents.

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