Get the Most Out of the Default Shell Section 2 Useful tcsh Shell Configuration

Get the most out of the default shell section 2

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Get the Most Out of the Default Shell Section 2. Useful tcsh Shell Configuration File Options Section 3. Create Shell Bindings Section 4. Use Terminal and X Bindings Section 5. Use the Mouse at a Terminal Section 6. Get Your Daily Dose of Trivia Section 7. Lock the Screen Section 8. Create a Trash Directory Section 9. Customize User Configurations Section 10. Maintain Your Environment on Multiple Systems Section 11. Use an Interactive Shell Section 12. Use Multiple Screens on One Terminal < Day Day Up >
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< Day Day Up > Hack 0 Introduction Users of open source ( ) Unix operating systems are an interesting breed. They like to poke under the surface of things, to find out how things work, and to figure out new and interesting ways of accomplishing common computing tasks. In short, they like to "hack." While this book concentrates on the BSDs, many of the hacks apply to any open source operating system. Each hack is simply a demonstration of how to examine a common problem from a slightly different angle. Feel free to use any of these hacks as a springboard to your own customized solution. If your particular operating system doesn't contain the tool used in the solution, use a tool that does exist, or invent your own! This chapter provides many tools for getting the most out of your working environment. You'll learn how to make friends with your shell and how to perform your most common tasks with just a few keystrokes or mouse clicks. You'll also uncover tricks that can help prevent command-line disasters. And, above all, you'll discover that hacking BSD is fun. So, pull your chair up to your operating system of choice and let's start hacking. < Day Day Up > < Day Day Up >
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Hack 1 Get the Most Out of the Default Shell Become a speed daemon at the command line. For better or for worse, you spend a lot of time at the command line. If you're used to administering a Linux system, you may be dismayed to learn that bash is not the default shell on a BSD system, for either the superuser or regular user accounts. Take heart; the FreeBSD superuser's default tcsh shell is also brimming with shortcuts and little tricks designed to let you breeze through even the most tedious of tasks. Spend a few moments learning these tricks and you'll feel right at home. If you're new to the command line or consider yourself a terrible typist, read on. Unix might be a whole lot easier than you think. NetBSD and OpenBSD also ship with the C shell as their default shell. However, it is not always the same tcsh, but often its simpler variant, csh, which doesn't support all of the tricks provided in this hack. However, both NetBSD and OpenBSD provide a tcsh package in their respective package collections.
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