Tone can vary widely from humorous to serious

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Tone: can vary widely, from humorous to serious. Regardless, a sense of factuality, not opinion, is at its base. Style/Language: most often going to be somewhat elevated, informative. Pacing: again, varies with topic, but successful narrative nonfiction will always draw its readers back in. Detailed examination of unusual subject that contributes to ‘mainstream’ discussion. Conveys a sense of wonder. SPIRITUALITY Change or transformation – readers look for a story that reflects some enlightenment The struggle to believe Elements of memoir, especially in the transformative nature of the story How-to manual for personal growth or personal enlightenment Outsider versus insider appeal – does the reader want a book about Looking at or Looking from Often poetic language is an appeal in spiritual writing SPORTS Nostalgia (such as readers can remember parents or grandparents taking them to a sports event or watching together on television)
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Living vicariously through sports biographies (someone commented how you still see children and adults wearing Michael Jordan t-shirts and jerseys all over the world) Sports biographies reflect the historical, social, and cultural record of the time period. Someone cited Joe Morgan’s biography ( Joe Morgan: a Life in Baseball by Joe Morgan and David Falkner) as containing vivid pictures of racism and segregation in the 1960’s. Someone else noted that the many Pete Rose biographies would presumably cover both baseball and gambling and reflect changing trends in ethics or morality. Readers like gaining insider knowledge of a world (professional or amateur sports) that many people know very little about. Sports books contain characters that readers can both love and hate. They often feature characters with generally strong personalities – many are entertaining, engaging, and likeable, but the opposite can also be true, such as demanding or self-centered subjects. There can be geographical appeal, as readers may be more interested in sports teams or individuals close to where they live. Recognition of the concept of “sports as life” – that is, the books are often about more than just “sport” and can reflect life’s lessons Are often written by prizewinning authors and/or sports journalists, therefore the quality of writing is equal to that of good fiction Tie-ins to fiction and historical fiction, such as W. P. Kinsella’s Shoeless Joe or Troy Soos’s baseball mysteries like Murder at Ebbets Field , etc. Can also include titles examining the economy or business aspect of sport (someone suggested Lords of the Realm: the Real History of Baseball by John Helyar) or even “how to” titles or something as specialized and beautifully illustrated as Glove Affairs: the Romance, History, and Tradition of the Baseball Glove by Noah Liberman TRUE CRIME Many at the table thought that True Crime appeals to mystery readers, as
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