Radhanath Ray draws images and metaphors from ordinary life Metaphors like

Radhanath ray draws images and metaphors from

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tradition and importance. Radhanath Ray draws images and metaphors from ordinary life. Metaphors like “kanduka” ( କਙୁକ ) 3 , “mrugakhi” ( ମ୍ରୁ ଗାଖી ) 13 are widely used by the people in their usual conversation. Radhanath’s selection of words has been from the colloquial language. Words such as: “abhisekoschaba” ( ଅଭିେସେକାઓઢବ ) 4 , “balysangini” ( ବାଲાସଂଗୀନୀ ) 5 are not farfetched, but drawn from the same soil. The fact that the poem is written in quarters, a familiar form of composition and could be received by the common Odia people, also exemplifies Ray’s manipulation. Thus, Ray is deliberate in Odianizing 6 the SLT to serve his purpose as mentioned in the discussion. Largely, his aim in the text is not to make equivalence of Metamorphoses , but to represent it for a definite cause. Radhanath Ray lived between the most significant periods of Odisha’s cultural history. For this period witnessed some of the major upheavals and cultural events that marked the rise of Odisha as a cultural, political and sub-national unit, and led to the creation of modern Odia consciousness. Ray offers us an unpretentious narrative in colloquial poetic language that blends personal narrative into the larger life of a sub-nation. Ray has made bold experiments in the language, form and content of poetry that initiated modernism in Odia poetry and he can justly be regarded as one of the makers of Odia literature. Among the many new things which Radhanath Ray brought into Odia poetry, there was a system of end-rhyming adopted from Bengali; blank-verse modelled on Michael Madhusudan Dutt’s Bengali poetry; a pictorial, musical but direct and unambiguous language, following Scott and Wordsworth; romantic legends concerning people and places; description of nature, lyrical poetry in the manner of British romanticist poets; satire in the manner of Dryden and Pope; denunciation of despots,
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INTERVENTIONS CAESURAE: POETICS OF CULTURAL TRANSLATION VOL2: 1 (ISSN 2454 -9495) SPECIAL ISSUE, JANUARY, 2017 73 tyrants and oppressors, concern with social problems, a spirit of protest against conventional morality; a disbelief in the power of Gods and Goddesses, and patriotic sentiments. Like all great literature, Radhanath Ray’s Odia translations reveal fissures and zones of ambivalence, both literary and historical. Radhanath Ray’s another epoch-making contribution was his literary translation. Ray has remarkably synthesized his borrowings and acquisitions in graceful, refined words, and displayed an unusual feat of imagination and talent in composing his original creations. The intrinsic merits and cultural significance of the translated Odia texts of Radhanath Ray elucidate his attitude towards the introduction of the English language and literature and the preservation of indigenous culture in the late nineteenth century. Radhanath Ray’s grasp of the nuances of both English and Odia, especially the disparate ‘cultural context’ through which the original as well as the translated text is remarkable as Ray beautifully employs the correct Odia
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