Physical weathering joints in r 1 Duration of weathering 2 Bedrock type 3

Physical weathering joints in r 1 duration of

This preview shows page 10 - 15 out of 20 pages.

4. Physical weathering: joints in rocks  1 Duration of weathering  2. Bedrock type  3. Climate  4. Topography  5. Soil: the residue of weathering  The basic soil-forming processes result in losses (transformations) and  additions (translocations).  6. Mass wasting  Mass wasting      includes all processes by which masses of rock and soil move  downslope.  Mass movement      occurs when the force of gravity exceeds the strength of the  material and it moves downslope.  Three primary factors   o Nature of slope materials (angle of repose) 
Image of page 10
Weathering, Erosion, and Mass Wasting  07:20 Unconsolidated      materials  Sand and silt  Tock fragments, sand, silt, and clay  Consolidated      materials  Rock  Compacted (cohesive) sediments and soils  o Amount of water Water content      Lubrication  Liquefaction o Steepness and stability  Angle of slope  Accumulation of rubble  Breakage into large blocks  Triggers of mass movements      o Earthquake vibrations o Rainfall and water infiltration  o Overloading  7. Classification of mass movements  Three characteristics used  o Nature of material      (rock or unconsolidated) 
Image of page 11
Weathering, Erosion, and Mass Wasting  07:20 o Velocity      (slow, moderate, or fast)  o Nature of movement      (flow, slide, or fall)  Rock mass movements  o Rock falls  o Rock slides  o Rock avalanches  Unconsolidated mass movements  o Creep  o Earthflow  o Debris flow  o Mudflow  o Debris avalanche  o Slump  o Debris Slide  Understanding the origins of mass movements  o Examples of landslide disasters  Spanish Fork, Utah (1983)  Gros Vertre Valley, Wyoming (1925)  Vaiont Dam, Italy (1963) 
Image of page 12
Hydrologic Cycle and Groundwater 07:20 Basic considerations  Hydrology is the study of movements and characteristics of groundwater.  The hydrologic cycle has a profound effect upon climate prediction  Water is vital so we must understand where to find water and how water  supplies cycle through the Earth  1. Water and reservoirs  Water  o The essence of life—necessary for the survival of all organisms  o Used for many things, but commonly taken for granted  o It is a critical resource  o Unique substance—exists as gas liquid and solid on Earth’s surface o It participates in all geological processes Salt Water 95.96%/Fresh Water 4.04%  Distribution of Fresh Water  o Most fresh water is in glaciers (74%)  o Most unfrozen water is groundwater (26%)  o Not all groundwater is fresh  o There is a limit to the amount of fresh water which we can use.  Reserves are limited o They are rapidly decreasing in quality and quantity  o They are nonrenewable  o Will there be sufficient quantities to sustain out future needs? 
Image of page 13
Hydrologic Cycle and Groundwater 07:20 o Is the quality adequate for the uses intended?  o Is it being used efficiently with a minimum and waste?  Hydrologic Cycle o Description of pathways water moves through various reservoirs  o Evaporates from land and sea surfaces and returns as precipitation as  
Image of page 14
Image of page 15

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 20 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture