Loony a silly fellow a natural corruption of looney

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~Loony~, a silly fellow, a natural. Corruption of LOONEY TICK (lunatic). Sometimes corrupted to LOOBY. ~Loose.~ _See_ ON THE LOOSE. ~Loose-box~, a brougham or other vehicle kept for the use of a _dame de compagnie_. A more vulgar appellation is “mot-cart,” the contemptuous sobriquet applied by the envious mob to a one-horse covered carriage. ~Loose-box~, a stable in which a horse is not tethered, but remains loose. ~Loot~, swag or plunder; also used as a verb. The word came much into vogue during the latest Chinese campaign. ~Lope~, this old form of leap is often heard in the streets. To LOPE is also to steal. _German_, LAUFEN. ~Lop-sided~, uneven, one side larger than the other. _See Jacob Faithful._ ~Lord~, a humpbacked man. _See_ MY LORD. ~Lord~, “drunk as a LORD,” a common saying, probably referring to the facilities a man of fortune has for such a gratification; perhaps a sly sarcasm at the supposed habits of the aristocracy. This phrase had its origin in the old hard drinking days, when it was almost compulsory on a man of fashion to get drunk regularly after dinner. ~Lord-mayor’s-fool~, an imaginary personage who likes everything that is good, and plenty of it. ~Lothario~, a “gay” deceiver; generally a heartless, brainless villain. ~Loud~, flashy, showy, as applied to dress or manner. _See_ BAGS. ~Lour~, or LOWR, money; “gammy LOWR,” bad money. From the Wallachian Gipsy word, LOWE, coined money. Possibly connected with the French, LOUER, to hire.—_Ancient Cant_ and _Gipsy_. ~Louse-trap~, a small-tooth comb.—_Old Cant._ _See_ CATCH-’EM-ALIVE. ~Love~, at billiards, rackets, and many other games, nothing: five points to none would be “five LOVE,”—a LOVE game being when one player does not score at all. The term is also used at whist, “six LOVE,” “four LOVE,” when one side has marked up six, four, or any other number, and the other none. A writer in the _Gentleman’s Magazine_ for July, 1780,
derives it either from LUFF, an old Scotch word for the hand, or from the _Dutch_, LOEF, the LOOF, weather-gauge (_Sewell’s Dutch Dictionary_, 4to, 1754); but it more probably, from the sense of the following, denotes something done without reciprocity. ~Love~, “to do a thing for LOVE,” _i.e._, for nothing. A man is said to marry for LOVE when he gets nothing with his wife; and an Irishman, with the bitterest animosity against his antagonist, will fight him for LOVE, _i.e._, for the mere satisfaction of beating him, and not for a stake. ~Loveage~, tap droppings, a mixture of stale spirits, sweetened and sold to habitual dram-drinkers, principally females. Called also “alls.” ~Low-water~, but little money in pocket, when the finances are at a low ebb. ~Lubber~, a clown, or fool.—_Ancient Cant_, LUBBARE. Among seamen an awkward fellow, a landsman. ~Lubber’s hole~, an aperture in the maintop of a ship, by which a timid climber may avoid the difficulties of the “futtock shrouds;” hence as a sea-term the LUBBER’S HOLE represents any cowardly way of evading duty. ~Luck~, “down on one’s LUCK,” wanting money, or in difficulty. ~Lucky~, “to cut one’s LUCKY,” to go away quickly. _See_ STRIKE. ~Ludlam’s dog.~ An indolent, inactive person is often said to be “as lazy as LUDLAM’S DOG, which leaned its head against the wall to bark.”

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