Systematic sampling cluster sampling random sampling

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Systematic Sampling Cluster Sampling Random Sampling D-3273HTG
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Lesson 5 Activity Worksheet Understanding Statistics (continued) Samples and Stats (continued) When choosing a sampling method, you need to beware of hidden biases. For example, imagine that you want to know if teenagers today are taller than teenagers in the past. You’ve found information about the average height of students in your school in 1940 and 1970. Now you need to find out the average height of students in your school today. You probably don’t want to get the height data from a sample consisting of members of the school basketball team! Why not? 1. Acting as your school’s census bureau, identify a characteristic of interest or importance to your school and choose a survey question. (Topic examples: transportation to and from school, team sports or other extracurricular activities, foreign languages studied, etc.) For some of these topics, you may be able to check the accuracy of your survey results against actual tallies your school keeps. Be sure not to ask questions about attitudes or opinions. Write your topic and survey question here: 2. Choose your target population. The target population is the group of people to whom you want the sample survey to apply. For instance, a survey about a school-related question could apply to the students in your grade or to the whole student body. Make sure you survey a good sample of your target population. ( For example, if your survey applies to a student body of 400, you might want to talk to at least 10%, or 40 people.) Write your target population and sample size here: __________________________________ 3. Based upon the steps above, which sampling method would you choose for your survey? Why? 4. Now conduct your sample survey and tabulate the results. Then organize your results into a graph or table and add a narrative summary. Share your graph, or table and summary, with the class. Design your own sample survey. 17 D-3273HTG
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