In the opening the counselor should go over the agenda inviting comments from

In the opening the counselor should go over the

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In the opening, the counselor should go over the agenda, inviting comments from the Marine before proceeding to the main bodyMAIN BODY:In the main body, the focus is on questioning, active listening, setting targets, providing feedback, and problem solving.While the process involves two-way communication, the counselor should still guide the discussion to ensure all objectives are covered.Once a subject has been fully discussed, move on.
When the performance targets have been established, the Marine should outline a plan for meeting them.This plan does not need to be elaborate, but it should be specific enough to satisfy an understanding of what is expected.CLOSING:Before the session ends, the counselor should take a few minutes to review the items discussed and ask for comments from the Marine.As the session ends, the counselor should provide a few words of encouragement.It is important to end the session on a positive, forward-looking note.The occasion is not a social one, but in many ways it is a personal one. It is important that the senior recognize this fact.FOLLOW-UP: Each counseling session should be documented so the counselor and the Marine can reference it.This documentation is only for use by the counselor and the Marine.Once the senior/subordinate relationship has ended, all documentation should be destroyed.Follow-up also requires continuous monitoring of the Marine with periodical reference to the performance targets agreed upon.In this process, the leader can use the counseling session and the targets to help the Marine improve and maintain a high level of performance.APPROACHES:The counselor's assessment of the situation determines the type of counseling approach they will use.• Time allotted for the session• The Marine's readiness to address performance issues• The seriousness of any issuesThere are three approaches to counseling (DIRECTIVE, NON-DIRECTIVE, COLLABORATIVE)DIRECTIVE:In the directive approach, the senior takes the lead in analyzing the Marine's performance, identifying the problems, and laying out a plan for improvement.The Marine Corps environment lends itself to the use of this approach, and in some cases, it is very productive as it takes less time.For Marines who are inexperienced, less mature, or unsure of themselves, it may be the only effective approach, depending on the diagnosis.If the problem is not identified correctly, the counselor could do more harm than good.Potential drawbacks to the directive approach:• Does not require Marines to take responsibility for their actions• Counselor may be focusing on a symptom rather than the causeFor these reasons, the directive approach should be used sparingly.NON-DIRECTIVE:In the non-directive approach, the senior asks questions, listens, and uses a variety of techniques to draw the Marine into a discussion to reach personal decisions.
This approach takes more time than the directive approach, and the counselor must demonstrate a high degree of counseling skill to achieve the results desired.

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