Beneatha is showing to the viewers that not only her but black women in general

Beneatha is showing to the viewers that not only her

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the viewers that not only her but black women in general are making attempts to resist the default stereotype of them by preparing themselves with education to attain their achievements.Moreover, Beneatha’s romantic relationship with Murchison and even Asagai shows the prejudice against woman at that time with cultural, educational and economic limitations. Like Walter‘s attitude, Beneatha‘s efforts to prepare herself as an independent black woman are challenged by both men's desire to persuade her into the traditional gender roles that holds back her creativity and talent. For example, despite Beneatha’s intelligence and willingness for self-discovery, George‘s only interest in her is just sexual since he makes clear that he only needs a
nice, good-looking girl that obeys him. Like Murchison, Asagai believes that a woman's value is good for nothing except marriage. Furthermore, his sexist idea that men are leaders and women have to obey not as partners but as men's followers. He thinks that Beneatha can only be good enough through marriage with him and as an assistance in his journey.Moreover, in her journey for self-identity, Beneatha sets her mind on learning culture. With pride and excitement, Beneatha wears the robe from Asagai, plays African music, tries to imitate a tribal dance, and become conscious of her natural hair. Beneatha desires to break free ofthe idea of black people having to conform to the white ones. Her new African hairstyle represents her embracing of her ancestors. It is, in fact, a powerful social statement, as she declares her pride in being a black woman, and that black is beautiful.Despite the fact that the ending does not give clear answers the problems surrounding the character Beneatha Young, it gets the viewers’ attention about the black people, especially black women. Also, Beneatha’s progress in becoming a doctor still remains unanswered since her brother loses the money to Willy Harris and refuses the white people’s money. However, the story opens a new view on gender roles, and expresses the author’s belief in gender equality, in women’s rights through the experiences of Beneatha Younger, the feminist whose faith in gender equality is finding a way through a male-dominated society. Work CitedHansberry, Lorraine. “A Raisin in The Sun”. Literature: A Portable Anthology. Eds. Janet, etd. Boston: Bedford/St.Martins, 2012. Print.
Mafe, Diana Adesola. "Black women on Broadway: the duality of Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun and Ntozake Shange's for colored girls." American Drama 15.2 (2006): 30+. Academic OneFile. Web. 11 June. 2016.Friedman, Sharon. "Feminism as Theme in Twentieth-century American Women's Drama." American Studies25.1 (1984): 69-89. Web. 11 June. 2016.Bernstein, Robin. “Inventing a fishbowl: White supremacy and the critical reception of Lorraine Hansberry's A raisin in the sun”. Modern Drama 42(1): 16-27. Web. 11 June. 2016Barthelemy, Anthony. "Mother, Sister, Wife: A Dramatic Perspective." The Southern Review 21.3: 770, 1 July 1985. Web. 11 June. 2016."13 Quotes by Black Women on Survival and Critical Self-Preservation." For Harriet.Web. 11June .2016."Patricia Hill Collins | SOCY L Sociology Department L University of Maryland." Patricia Hill Collins | SOCY L Sociology Department L University of Maryland. Web. 11 June .2016.

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