Himmler realized that women were an important labor force for carrying out his

Himmler realized that women were an important labor

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Himmler realized that women were an important labor force for carrying out his genocidal plans and the presence of women in the SS workplace increased. Elite women, such as Liselotte Meier, worked in the East and were part of the planning behind the massacres of Jews. Upon reading about these horrific examples of acts committed by certain women, the larger question rises about how we can make sense of these women's role in Nazi genocide, especially considering that Lower’s main argument revolves around the assertion that these 13 3
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Young women were not sociopaths, but ordinary women who were not violent nor abrasive at all before the war. Lower concludes by discussing what happened to the women perpetrators after the Holocaust and why their atrocities were largely ignored during the Final Solution and in the decades following. Lower argues that Germany’s culture of forgetting led the atrocities of women to be covered up or underplayed in the courtroom. There was also a prevalent gender bias. Stereotypically, violent acts and genocide are associated with men and not women. The Nazi’s had created the ideal image of a wholesome, domesticated, caring women. Exposing women in the courtroom would have threatened the Nazi party’s gender ideology. In court the German defense lawyers swayed the courts to believe that women did not partake in the violence and genocide of the war. Persecutors were also more concerned with punishing males in powerful positions. The courts thus deemed women as unthreatening to European society and they got off easier than men whom had committed similar crimes. Regarding the topic of women in the Holocaust, the prevailing understanding among history and literature is that there were extremely atrocious female concentration camp guards and Nazi party criminals. The larger picture of Lower’s argument has been spoken of for a while; Nazi women were heinous in there treatment of the Jews, expressed anti semitic values, supported their husbands, and had a working role in the Holocaust. In building on this idea, Lower uses this notion and specific detailed accounts of women perpetrators to argue that women “were to a degree representative of a much bigger phenomenon that had been suppressed, overlooked and under-researched." (Lower, 4). While Lower does a thorough job at building onto the pre-existing notion of female anti semitism during the Holocaust, her argument has several problems. Foremost, six of the women 4
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Young that Lower discusses are perpetrators, and in general Lower only focuses on women who are casual killers rather than professional women killers in high powered positions of the SS. The
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