of Massachusetts would enter the Union as a free state in order to maintain the

Of massachusetts would enter the union as a free

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CANADA New York Tennessee North Carolina South Carolina Georgia Alabama Virginia Kentucky Rhode Island Connecticut
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New York Tennessee North Carolina South Carolina Georgia Alabama FLORIDA TERRITORY Virginia Kentucky A r k a n s a s R i v e r R e d R i v e r S a b i n e R i v e r Rhode Island Connecticut
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CHAPTER 7Section 7.2 James Monroe: The Last of the FoundersA Treaty With SpainMonroe had equal success in settling several disputes with Spain that had plagued the two nations since the presidency of Thomas Jefferson. For one, the boundary between the Spanish Empire and the United States had never been precisely determined after the Louisiana Purchase. Equally troubling to the Spanish was the situation in Florida. Monroe had sent Andrew Jackson into Florida in 1817 to pursue Seminole Indians who were raid-ing American settlements in the old Southwest. Jackson went beyond his original orders, capturing Spain’s remaining forts and setting off an international crisis.Adams negotiated the Transcontinental Treaty—also known as the Adams–Onís Treaty—to settle both disputes. In the east, the border would follow the Red, Arkansas, and Sabine Rivers and then head due west along the 42nd parallel to the Rocky Mountains (Figure 7.2). The United States would pay $5 million to Spain for Florida on the condition that Spain would in turn give all the money to American settlers who had suffered from Seminole raids.Changing Status of Democracy Around the WorldEven in the midst of all this success, by the early 1820s Monroe and Adams could see new problems on the horizon. On the one hand, the United States had finally secured its place as a free nation on the world stage, and nearly simultaneously most of the people of Latin America had won their independence from Spain. Inspired by the ideals of the American and French Revolutions, the newly independent nations of Central and South America had all declared their commitment to democracy, even as they struggled to bring it to frui-tion. But on the other hand, the nations of Continental Europe had turned their backs on democracy. Following the final defeat of Napoleon in 1815, diplomats at the Congress of
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