Thoracic cavity Two pleural cavities Each cavity surrounds one lung Mediastinum

Thoracic cavity two pleural cavities each cavity

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Ventral Body Cavity (cont.) Thoracic cavity Two pleural cavities Each cavity surrounds one lung Mediastinum Contains pericardial cavity Surrounds other thoracic organs, such as esophagus, trachea, etc. Pericardial cavity Encloses heart
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Ventral Body Cavity (cont.) Abdominopelvic cavity Abdominal cavity Contains stomach, intestines, spleen, and liver Pelvic cavity Contains urinary bladder, reproductive organs, and rectum
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Figure 1.9 Dorsal and ventral body cavities and their subdivisions. Cranial cavity (contains brain) Cranial cavity Vertebral cavity Dorsal body cavity Superior mediastinum Pleural cavity Pericardial cavity within the mediastinum Ventral body cavity (thoracic and abdomino- pelvic cavities) Thoracic cavity (contains heart and lungs) Vertebral cavity (contains spinal cord) Diaphragm Abdominal cavity (contains digestive viscera) Pelvic cavity (contains urinary bladder, reproductive organs, and rectum) Lateral view Anterior view Abdomino- pelvic cavity Dorsal body cavity Ventral body cavity
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Clinical – Homeostatic Imbalance 1.1 Whereas the pelvic bones provide limited protection to the pelvic cavity, the walls of abdominal cavity are formed by muscle only, so organs in this area are most vulnerable to trauma
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Ventral Body Cavity (cont.) Membranes in ventral body cavity Serosa (also called serous membrane ) Thin, double-layered membranes that cover surfaces in ventral body cavity Parietal serosa lines internal body cavity walls Visceral serosa covers internal organs (viscera) Double layers are separated by slit-like cavity filled with serous fluid Fluid secreted by both layers of membrane
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Ventral Body Cavity (cont.) Named for specific cavity and organs that they are associated with Pericardium Heart Pleurae Lungs Peritoneum Abdominopelvic cavity
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Figure 1.10 Serous membrane relationships. Outer balloon wall (comparable to parietal serosa) Air (comparable to serous cavity) Inner balloon wall (comparable to visceral serosa) A fist thrust into a flaccid balloon demonstrates the relationship between the parietal and visceral serous membrane layers.
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  • Fall '16
  • Sultana
  • Physiology, Anatomy, Anatomical terms of location, ventral body cavity, Pelvic cavity

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