Turn down the lamp rheostat and click the lamp off

Info icon This preview shows pages 15–18. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
• Turn down the Lamp Rheostat and click the Lamp “Off”. • Wind the Cord neatly between the Binocular Eyepieces, around and inside the Stage Controls, and around the Focusing Knobs (Whoopie-Ti-Yi-Yo Lariat Style). What! You ʼ ve never ridden a Horse? Then, Dude , wind it like you ʼ d wind your Vacuum Cleaner Cord. Listen to your Cord. Some Cords are trying to tell you they want to go up and between the Eyepieces first; others are trying to tell you they want to go under the Stage first and then up between the Eyepeices. • Place the Plastic Cover over your Microscope. • Return your Microscope to its correct Location in the Cabinet - 谢谢 Xie-Xie!
Image of page 15

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lab 3 Page 16 Isolations Pseudomonas sp. 1. Look for Clear-to-White Colonies. 2. Make a Gram Stain and confirm the Presence of Gram Negative Rods. 3. Restreak your Pseudomonas Isolate onto Nutrient Agar using the same Colony you used to make your Gram Stain. 4. Incubate at 30°C for 48 Hours. 5. Save your Pseudomonas Mother Plate at 04°C. Bacillus sp. 1. Look for White Colonies with a Frosted Glass Appearance. 2. Make a Gram Stain and confirm the Presence of Gram Positive Rods. 3. Restreak your Bacillus Isolate onto Nutrient Agar using the same Colony you used to make your Gram Stain. 4. Incubate at 30°C for 48 Hours. 5. Save your Bacillus Mother Plate at 04°C. Skin Bacteria 1. Look for Yellow Colonies w/o a Zone of Clearing (Micrococcus luteus ) or White Colonies with a Zone of Clearing (Staphylococcus epidermidis ). 2. Make a Gram Stain and confirm the Presence of Gram Positive Cocci. 3. Restreak your Skin Bacterium onto YGC Agar using the same Colony you used to make your Gram Stain. 4. Incubate at 37°C for 48 Hours. 5. Save your Skin Bacteria Mother Plate at 04°C. Enteric Bacteria 1. Look for White or Cream-colored Colonies 2. Make a Gram Stain and confirm the Presence of Gram Negative Rods 3. Restreak a Nutrient Agar Plate using Bacteria from the same Colony you used to make your Gram Stain. 4. Incubate at 37°C for 24 Hours. 5. Save your Enteric Mother Plate at 04°C.
Image of page 16
Lab 3 Page 17 Wet Mount of Cyanobacteria (Open Lab only) [Figure 11-10, Page 126] During Open Lab you can make a Wet-Mount Slide and look at Cyanobacteria (aka Blue Green Algae). They’re relatively Large and incredibly Green, which makes them really easy to find. Looking at our Nostoc is a good Introduction to the “Feel” of your Zeiss Microscope’s Controls. Nostoc Strands looks like Jade Bead Necklaces. Most of the individual Cells making-up the Strands will be the same Size but be on the lookout for the occasional Heterocyst (G= different cell) . Materials (per Student): • Slides • Cover Slips • Nostoc sp. Culture (1 Flask on the Imperial Lab Back Bench) Procedure 1. Use a Pasteur Pipette to aspirate a small Amount of Fluid It ʼ s almost always best to draw-up your Sample from the Bottom of the Vessel. Cyanobacteria are Green and if there ʼ s nothing Green in your Pipette, there probably aren ʼ t any Cyanobacteria in your Pipette.
Image of page 17

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 18
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern