PHRM 514 STD's Fall 2012 (1)

Trends in sexually transmitted diseases in the united

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Unformatted text preview: Trends in sexually transmitted diseases in the United States: 2010 national data for gonorrhea, chlamydia, and syphilis. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats09/trends.htm. Updated November 17, 2011. Accessed October 17, 2012. Gonorrhea Gonorrhea 2010 Statistics n 309,341 reported cases n 100.8 cases/100,000 people § Women 106.5 cases/100,000 § Men 94.1 cases/100,000 n Increased 2.8% since 2009 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2010. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2011. Gonorrhea: Microbiology n Caused by Neisseria gonorhoeae n Gram negative diplococcus n Grows best in warm, mucus secreting epithelia Knodel, LC. Sexually transmitted diseases. In: DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors. Pharmacotherapy a pathophysiologic approach. 8th ed. New York: McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:2011-2028. Mehring, PM. Sexually transmitted diseases. In: Porth, CM, editor. Pathophysiology Concepts of Altered Health States. 7th Ed. Philadelphia: Porth Lippincott Williams and Wilkins; 2005:1101-1110. Gonorrhea: Pathophysiology 1. Gonococci attach to cell membranes of mucosal epithelium by surface pili 2. N. gonorrhoeae penetrates through epithelial cells to submucosal tissue 3. Mucosal damage occurs (sloughing of epithelium) 4. Polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocytes invade the tissue 5. Submucosal abscesses form and purulent exudates (pus) are secreted Knodel, LC. Sexually transmitted diseases. In: DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors. Pharmacotherapy a pathophysiologic approach. 8th ed. New York: McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:2011-2028. Honeywell MS, Thompson MD. Sexually transmitted infections. In: Chisholm-Burns M, Schwinghammer T, Wells B, et al. Pharmacotherapy Principles and Practice. 2nd ed. New York: McGraw Hill Medical;2010:1317-1335. Gonorrhea: Clinical Presentation Males Females Incubation Period 1-14 days 1-14 days Symptom Onset 2-8 days 10 days Most Common Site of Infection Urethra Endocervical canal Other Sites of Infection Rectum, eye, oropharynx Urethra, eye, rectum, oropharynx Knodel, LC. Sexually transmitted diseases. In: DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors. Pharmacotherapy a pathophysiologic approach. 8th ed. New York: McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:2011-2028. Gonorrhea: Clinical Presentation Males Females Symptoms Urethral infection – dysuria, urinary frequency Anorectal infection – severe rectal pain Pharyngeal infection – mild pharyngitis Endocervical infection – asymptomatic to mildly symptomatic Urethral infection...
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Trends in sexually transmitted diseases in the United...

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