Jazz is a completely planned musical dialogue among the musicians who are

Jazz is a completely planned musical dialogue among

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2. Jazz is a completely planned musical dialogue among the musicians who are performing it. T F 3. Jazz, more than any other music, has been linked with legal and social equality for all, particularly Native Americans. F 4. Jazz is a music of the present moment. F 5. Jazz is an "old timer" to music, like symphonic music. F 6. Jazz was born out of the Black experience in America. T F 7. Jazz fuses both African and European musical traditions. F 8. Jazz evolved from rock 'n roll. F 9. Jazz evolved from spirituals. F 10. Jazz first appeared in the early 1800s. T F 11. Jazz first appeared in New Orleans. F 12. Europeans devised the major elements of jazz. F 13. African Americans have had the most influence on the development of jazz. F 14. The 1920s was known as the "Classical Age." T F 15. Jazz is more about the way music is played rather than what is played. F 16. Jazz is relatively simple. F 17. Jazz makes less demands on the listener than most other popular styles. F 18. The core of jazz is about feeling, not intellectual definition. T F 19. There are many musical, technical, and emotional elements occurring simultaneously in jazz. F 20. Jazz is America's indigenous art form. F 21. Jazz has made no impact on American culture. F 22. James Weldon Johnson’s poem O Black and Unknown Bards reflects the view that music was an important part of African American culture. T F 23. In the 1920s the Cotton Club in New York broke down racial barriers by featuring integrated jazz bands and opening its doors to black and white patrons. F 24. President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and the passage of the Reconstruction amendments to the Constitution ended racial segregation in America. F 25. Jazz musicians helped to break down barriers between the people of the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War. F
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Write a one to two page answer. Essay Question #1 Reread the impressions you jotted down while listening to each of the jazz selections at the beginning of the lesson. Compare each tune's differences and similarities, if any. Can you group any of the songs together by melody, rhythm, or mood? Why or why not. Essay question #2 Are any of the tunes you heard at the beginning of the lesson more familiar to you than others? Describe why or why not. Include impressions you had about rhythm, melody, which instruments you recognized, and how they sound together. Essay question #3
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