ANTH Lectures.docx

Increased dependancy on sense of sight stereoscopic

  • No School
  • AA 1
  • 11

This preview shows page 4 - 7 out of 11 pages.

- increased dependancy on sense of sight; stereoscopic colour vision - more acute sense of touch 3. Primate Brain - increase in brain size - areas of concuss thought ow dramatically - enlarged cortex 4. Primate Skeleton - skull opening for spinal cord shifts towards the base - arms at side, not front - more flexible digits in hands and feet - opposable thumb Adaptation Through Behaviour - Learned social behaviour plays an important role - examination of modern primate behaviour may lead to clues to early primate be- haviour and the emergence of human cultural behaviour Chimpanzee Behaviour - Can use tools - Maintain strong mother-child bond - Promiscuous sex during time female is fertile - open subgroups - grooming is a common pastime Human Ancestors - Genetic separation at least 5.5 million years ago - Fossil evidence clearly shows separation at least 4.4 million years ago - Living in Africa - Forced by climatic changes to leave trees The First Hominids - Hominine: subfamily of primates that includes humans and near humans
Image of page 4

Subscribe to view the full document.

- Ardipithecus : 4.4 m.y.a. chimpanzee like fossils, walked upright in woodland envi- ronment, 3 ft tall, found in Ethiopia - Australopithecus : 4.2 m.y.a. most successful hominine, bipedal, small brain and stature, lived for 3 million years, LUCY (good specimen, skeleton and lower body) - Homo Habilis : 2.5-1.5 m.y.a. “handy man”, increased brain complexity and size, meat diet and tool maker, Africa only - Culture: using wits to compete with large animals, butchering sites, food sharing and preparation, Oldowan tools, Palaeolithic - Homo Erectus : 2 m.y.a.-150,000 y.a. species directly ancestral to modern human, use of fire, first to travel (Asia, Indonesia, china), language and social structure - culture: fire and cooking 700000 years ago, toolkit diversity - Homo Ergaster = erectus in Africa, “working man” - in Europe complex spears - brain takes 20-25% of food energy - omnivore adaptation - Homo Sapiens : 400,000 b.p.? archaic forms to modern peoples, - Neanderthals: 130,000-30,000 b.p. - in 2003 found Idaltu (160,000 b.p.) near modern homo sapien, mitochondrial evidence for out of Africa migration - no evolution from proto to human - homo sapiens from asia 30,000-20,000-15,000 b.p. - free ice corridor to continent - west coast- boats? - Genographic Project - national geographic, Australia 60,000 y.a. migration, humans in the new world Lecture 6 Wednesday, September 30 Film on Evolution Humans Who Are We: The Birth of the Human Mind - Gesture call system was on here Lecture 7 Monday, October 5 - timeline showing evolution of humans Migration of Homo Sapiens 50,000-20,000 y.a. - Upper Paleolithic - Cultural explosion: clothes, tools, technology, burial, art, music, larger villages 10,000 y.a. - Agriculture
Image of page 5
8,000 y.a. - Villages, towns, cities 6,000 y.a. - complex civilizations - Food production 5,000 y.a. - Several complex civilizations - Animal domestication - Always coexistence of low tech “subsistence” cultures and high tech “industrial” Lecture 8 Wednesday, October 7 Language and Communication - Need: complex vocal components, lips, tongue, palate, breath, teeth, larynx —> all in- volved - Symbol: assigned meaning, social agreement - “Open”: complex meaning ex. cross or nazi symbol - “Closed”: signal or sign that has a fixed meaning ex. stop or yield sign
Image of page 6

Subscribe to view the full document.

Image of page 7
  • Fall '19

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern