In any case it seems clear that kallipolis is

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In any case, it seems clear that Kallipolis is intended to provide its mem- bers with as much deliberative freedom as their natures, fully developed in optimal conditions, permit: Why do you think someone is reproached for menial work or handi- craft? Or shall we say that it is for no other reason than because the best element is naturally weak in him, so that it cannot rule the beasts within him, but can only serve them and learn what flatters them? . . . In order to ensure, then, that someone like that is also ruled by some- thing similar to what rules the best person, we say that he should be the slave of that best person who has the divine ruler within himself. It is not to harm the slave that we say he should be ruled, as Thrasyma- chus supposed was true of all subjects, but because it is better for everyone to be ruled by a divine and wise ruler—preferably one that is his own and that he has inside himself—otherwise one imposed on him from outside, so that we may all be as alike and as friendly as pos- sible, because we are all captained by the same thing. (590c–d; also 395b–c)
Introduction xxvii Thus, even if we retain our liberal suspicion about the possibility of a sci- ence of values, we might still, by coming to see merit in the idea of deliber- ative freedom, also come to see the Republic, not as predominantly a totalitarian hymn to the benefits of repression and unfreedom, but as an attempt to design a city whose members enjoy as much real happiness, and as much real freedom, as possible.
xxviii Select Bibliography Adam, J. The Republic of Plato . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1902. (Critical edition of the Greek text, with notes and commentary.) Annas, J. An Introduction to Plato’s Republic. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1981. Bobonich, C. Plato’s Utopia Recast: His Later Ethics and Politics . Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2002. Burnyeat, M. “Platonism and Mathematics: A Prelude to Discussion.” In Mathemat- ics and Metaphysics in Aristotle, edited by A. Graeser, pp. 213–40. Bern: Paul Haupt, 1987. ———. “Plato on Why Mathematics is Good for the Soul.” In Mathematics and Necessity, edited by T. Smiley, pp. 1–81. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. ———. “Plato.” Proceedings of the British Academy 111 (2000): 1–22. Cooper, J. M. “The Psychology of Justice in Plato.” American Philosophical Quarterly 14 (1977): 151–7. Reprinted in his Reason and Emotion, pp. 138–50. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999. ———. “Plato’s Theory of Human Motivation.” History of Philosophy Quarterly 1 (1984): 3–21. Reprinted in his Reason and Emotion, pp. 118–37. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999. Ferrari, G. City and Soul in Plato’s Republic. Sankt Augustin: Academia Verlag, 2003. Fine, G., ed. Plato 1: Metaphysics and Epistemology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999. ———. Plato 2: Ethics, Politics, Religion, and the Soul. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.

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