Figure 3 typical resistor with bands denoting its

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Figure 3: Typical resistor with bands denoting it’s resistance value To read the resistor code start at the end opposite the tolerance band. Identify the first band and write down the number associated with that color. Do the same with the two subsequent bands. The first band represents the first digit of the resistance value, the second band represents the second digit and the third band represents the value of the ’multiplier’ (it’s called a multiplier 4
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because you are multiplying the first two bands by 10 to the power of the number associated with the third band). For example if the bands were Brown (1), Blue (6) and Red (2) then the value of the resistance would be 16 × 10 2 Ω = 1600Ω. If the ’tolerance’ band was gold (5% 80Ω) then, when measuring the resistance with your DMM, you’d expect to find the resistance to be in the range 1600 ± 80Ω. Now try it yourself: What is the resistance of a resistor with bands Green Black Black? What colors might you expect to see on a resistor you measured to have resistance 1984Ω (include the tolerance band)? Determine the resistance of two of the resistors at your lab bench. Now measure them and see if they are within the specified tolerance. 5 Digital Multimeter The Digital Multimeter (DMM) is one of the primary measuring instruments used when studying electronics. At its most basic it’s capable of measuring DC Voltage, DC Current and Resistance. Though many DMM’s appear different they all possess common features. These include: Digital screen that displays the value of the measurement Dial to switch between different measurement settings Two probes Several input jacks Figure 4: Configuring your DMM for DC Voltage, Resistance and DC Current measurements (respectively) All measurements are made using both probes. When used correctly the tips of the probes make electrical contact (metal to metal contact) with your circuit. When making a measurement there are three things you need to know: What setting the dial should be set to. 5
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Which input jack is appropriate for your measurement. How the probes are to be connected to your circuit. IMPORTANT: Using the wrong input jacks, the wrong switch position or the wrong connection of your probes to the circuit could result in damage to the DMM. If you’re unsure please ask your TA. Figure ?? shows the different settings and configurations for a basic DMM. Next, you will practice using your DMM in its various configurations to measure properties of a simple circuit. When making measurements there are two distinct orientations for the DMM; these are named “series” and “parallel” and will be described in the next section. 6 Measurements: Series and Parallel Now you will utilize your DMM to measure the voltage and current of a simple circuit made up of a single battery and light bulb. By doing so you will practice configuring your DMM in the two basic orientations defined as follows (shown in Figure ?? ):
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