Until now there is evidence for the king guth frith

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Until now, there is evidence for the king Guth- frith in Æthelweard's Chronicle 895, and as the king Guthred with the term 'Airdeconut' mentioned on the coin from the Silverdale hoard , estimated depo- sition 900-10 AD 17 . Factually, it seems to that Guthred filium Hardacnut is a historical person. ~ ~
5 The Silverdale hoard with more than 200 pieces silver and jewellery from the date about 900-10 AD discovered 2011 in Silverdale, Lancashire located on the edge of Morecambe Bay, on the Irish Sea coast. S IGFRED THE E ARL Adam of Bremen reports 18 that Guthred fol- lowed Halfdan - and his sons, Olaf, Sigfred og Ragnald were kings of Northumbria. Adam cited - a now lost - Gesta Anglorum containing this infor- mation. ‘In Angliam quoque miserunt unum ex sociis Halpdani, qui dum ab Anglis occideretur, Dani constituerunt in locum eius Gudredum. Is autem Nordimbriam expugnavit. Scrip- tum est in Gestis Anglorum’ (Praefatio, Ca- pitulum 41). ‘They also sent one of Halfdan's companions to Anglia. When he was killed by the Angles, the Danes set Guthred in his place. This conquered Northumbria, which is written in Gesta Anglorum’. ‘Anglia, ut supra diximus et in Gestis Anglorum scribitur, post mortem Gudredi a filiis eius Analaph, Sigtrih et Reginold, per annos fere centum permansit in ditione Danorum’ (Liber Secundus,Capitulum 22). ‘As written in Gesta Anglorum, and after the dead of Guthred, his sons Olaf, Sigfred and Ragnald reigned Anglia which remained under Danish domination for almost a hundred years’. Chronicon Æthelweardi 893-(4) mentions a possi- ble Sigfred leading a Norse fleet against North Devon, and besieges Exeter with 140 ships, which implies that Northumbria was the homeland of Sigfred ( Sigeferth piraticus de Northymbriorum uertit ad proprias sedes ). ‘Sigeferth the pirate arrived from the land of the North- umbrians with a large fleet, ravaged twice along the coast on that one expedition, and afterwards sailed back to his own land’. This decade, the Norsemen had an interactive trade between the cities of Dublin and York which at one time stagnated due to internal unrest in the control of Dublin 19 . Therefore, Sigfred the Earl ( Sichfrit in erll ) was sent to Dublin to bring rest in the camp. ‘Mescbaidh mór for Gallaibh Atho Cliath co n-dechadur i n-esriuth, indala rand dibh la m. nImair, ind rann n-aile la Sichfrith nIerll’ (Ulster annals 893.4). ‘A great disturbance among the foreigners of Áth Cliath, and they dispersed, one of their divisions went with the son of Ívarr, and the other division with Sigfred the Earl’. This led to, that Sihtric I Ivarsson in Dublin was deposed 20 and Sigfred Earl Guthredsson took over the power for a while the following year.
Northumbrian coinage until 910 Sigfred was issuing coins bearing his name, the title of King, and the mint signature for the city of York ( Ebraice Civitas ). He is spelled on the coins as both the Latinised Siefredus (c. 894-98) and the Anglicised Sievert (c. 895-902).

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