Increased emigration Jews trying to leave are being rejected entry by other

Increased emigration jews trying to leave are being

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Increased emigration, Jews trying to leave are being rejected entry by other countries 400 total ghettos created Ghettos created as a transition period. Decision to murder hasn’t been made yet. Judenrat's in charge of the ghettos Resistance as a Jewish response Then some plans start to arise after this like Madagascar plan Treatment of the disabled acts as a model for the decision to kill Jews. *Transition is the invasion of the Soviet Union then followed by extermination in '42 PHASE 3 (1942-1945) : o Extermination Vonsey conference: consolidated extermination ideas with a rubber stamp but didn’t create them. (Conspiracy movie on netflix) Jewsish Responses: Warsaw ghetto uprising All of the extermination camps were in the east. All of the second part of the exam can be answered with understanding the phases. 2. Nazi policies towards others
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Who: o Sinti and Roma o A-socials Homosexuality: not contributing to the state with reproduction Talk about gender. Homosexual women could be forced to procreate and even marry o Disabled Sterilization/ Cleansing of society Didn’t want them representing/ bringing down the German race. 3. Global Response Immigration laws- biggest factor The Germans were careful to what was published in global press. Like 1936 Olympics Briannah Brooks JS 211 23 April 2018 Final Writing Assignment 1. The Holocaust: Nazi Policy Towards the Jews and Jewish Responses, 1933-1945 a. Nazi Policies i. Racial laws: 1. Nuremburg laws: can’t fly German flag, can’t have relationship with German. 2. One Jewish grandparent= you’re Jewish. ii. Euthanasia before Final Solution 1. Alien races: Sinti and Roma, Poles, Afro-German 2. Degenerates: Disabled, mentally ill, perpetually unemployed, alcoholic iii. Final Solution 1941-1945 b. Jewish Responses i. Emigration 1. technically permitted to leave until 1941, became unsafe by 1939 ii. Surviving ghettos 1. Remarkable responses/adjustments 2. Examining Perpetrators: Personal Responsibility and the Banality of Evil a. Were these ordinary men? i. Interpretations: 1. Arendt 2. Browning 3. Goldhagen b. Were these ordinary women? i. Women different levels of active. ii. Conclusion: still perps and still held accountable c. Non-German perpetrators i. Poles
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ii. French iii. Other 3. How Did ‘Bystanders’ Respond? a. Neighbors b. American Responses i. The biggest thing they could have done was open their boarders. c. Gentiles that saved i. Hiding in plain sight ii. Hiding in homes/property iii. Aiding in smuggling/escaping 1. Sauvage’s Weapons of the Spirit in Le Chambon, France 4. The Aftermath: Justice, Punishment, and Denial a. Postwar Justice i. Nuremburg trials ii. Other trials b. Justice i. Some were let off (Poles), some were held accountable c. Denial i. Popular Nazi response: following orders Expansion on perpetrators 5. Examining Perpetrators: Personal Responsibility and the Banality of Evil a. Were these ordinary men?
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