Tobacco cessation fall 2011 Instructor (1)_ For use in lecture (3)

Importance of behavioral counseling set a quit date

Info iconThis preview shows pages 67–74. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Importance of behavioral counseling Set a quit date Recommend Tobacco Use Log Helps patients to understand when and why they use tobacco Identifies activities or situations that trigger tobacco use Can be used to develop coping strategies to overcome the temptation to use tobacco STAGE 3: PREPARATION Facilitate Quitting Process HANDOUT Continue regular tobacco use for 3 or more days Each time any form of tobacco is used, log the following information: Time of day Activity or situation during use “Importance” rating (scale of 1–3) Review log to identify situational triggers for tobacco use; develop patient-specific coping strategies STAGE 3: PREPARATION Facilitate Quitting Process (cont’d) Tobacco Use Log: Instructions for use Discuss coping strategies Cognitive coping strategies Focus on retraining the way a patient thinks Behavioral coping strategies Involve specific actions to reduce risk for relapse STAGE 3: PREPARATION Facilitate Quitting Process (cont’d) HANDOUT Review commitment to quit Distractive thinking Positive self-talk Relaxation through imagery Mental rehearsal and visualization Cognitive Coping Strategies STAGE 3: PREPARATION Facilitate Quitting Process (cont’d) Thinking about cigarettes doesn’t mean you have to smoke one: “Just because you think about something doesn’t mean you have to do it!” Tell yourself, “It’s just a thought,” or “I am in control.” Say the word “STOP!” out loud, or visualize a stop sign. When you have a craving, remind yourself: “The urge for tobacco will only go away if I don’t use it.” As soon as you get up in the morning, look in the mirror and say to yourself: “I am proud that I made it through another day without tobacco.” Cognitive Coping Strategies: Examples STAGE 3: PREPARATION Facilitate Quitting Process (cont’d) Control your environment Tobacco-free home and workplace Remove cues to tobacco use; actively avoid trigger situations Modify behaviors that you associate with tobacco: when, what, where, how, with whom Substitutes for smoking Water, sugar-free chewing gum or hard candies (oral substitutes) Take a walk, diaphragmatic breathing, self-massage Actively work to reduce stress, obtain social support, and alleviate withdrawal symptoms Behavioral Coping Strategies STAGE 3: PREPARATION Facilitate Quitting Process (cont’d) Provide medication counseling Promote compliance Discuss proper use, with demonstration Discuss concept of “slip” versus relapse “Let a slip slide.”“Let a slip slide....
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page67 / 162

Tobacco cessation fall 2011 Instructor (1)_ For use in lecture (3)

This preview shows document pages 67 - 74. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online