Research suggests that early childhood education

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Research suggests that early childhood education programs are effective in improving outcomes for young children, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds. Benefits include improved cognitive and social development and better transitions to primary school. Early childhood education programs also have long-term benefits for children, such as higher rates of school completion and employment, and reduced criminal activity and welfare dependence. Extremely long hours of care may pose a risk, but the quality of care is thought to be social disadvantage unemployment low socio-economic status inadequate and overcrowded housing geographic isolation for those living in remote locations poor access to services affordable healthy food.
Learner Guide 4 Version No. 1.6 Produced 15 March 2018 Page 151 III. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND PLAY Traditionally known as childcare or kindergarten, Early Childhood Education and Care has been part of the Australian education system since the 19th century - although with very different methodology to what we see today. (Play Australia, n.d.) benefits of early childhood education. Community beliefs and the value of family caring for children still had a strong influence on early childhood programs with most preschool programs only offering ½ day programs once a week. While community beliefs began to shift over time, perceptions that mothers are the best people to care for children in the early years, and that group care can have a recognising the importance of providing high-quality care. Combined with the need for many mothers to stay in the workforce, both communities and governments began to commit to supporting the provision of quality early childhood education programs. Pedagogy of Early Childhood Education Pedagogy (the professional practice of educators including building and nurturing relationships, curriculum decision making, teaching and learning) has also gone through some major changes over time. Even though early child education has been mainly playing and cares based, the programs changed from the structured theme more child-centred approach is taken. Currently, best practice sees children being regarded as active, capable learners which underpins the National Quality Framework and is especially important in implementing the Early Years Learning Framework.
Learner Guide 4 Version No. 1.6 Produced 15 March 2018 Page 152 Physical, social, emotional, personal, spiritual, creative, cognitive and linguistic aspects of learning are all intricately interwoven and interrelated. The play is a context for learning that: allows for the expression of personality and uniqueness enhances dispositions such as curiosity and creativity enables children to make connections between prior experiences and new learning assists children to develop relationships and concepts stimulates a sense of wellbeing.

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