Ex Toad Fleet day VCE Two vowels appear in a word and one is an e at the end of

Ex toad fleet day vce two vowels appear in a word and

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Ex: Toad, Fleet, day. - VCE: Two vowels appear in a word and one is an e at the end of the word; first vowel long and final e is silent. Ex: Cape, rope, kite - CV: Consonant followed by vowel, vowel usually produces long sound. Ex: Be, go, so - R-Controlled Vowels: Vowels that appear before the letter r are usually neither long nor short, but tend to be overpowered or swallowed up by the sound. Ex: Person, player, neighborhood, herself Phoneme segmentation: Separating words into sounds; Teacher: How many words are in grab? Student: /g/ /r/ /a/ /b/; 4 sounds. Phoneme isolation : Children recognize the same sounds in different words. Teacher: What is the first sound in van? Student: the first sound in van is /v/. Phoneme substitution: Children substitute one phoneme for another to make a new word; Teacher: The word is bug. Change the /g/ to /n/. What’s the new word? Student: Bun. Echo Reading: When readers reread or “echo” what has just been read to them, it is called echo reading Phoneme categorization: Children recognize the word in a set of 3-4 words that has the “odd” sound. Teacher: Which word doesn’t belong? Bus, Bun, Rug. Student: Rug doesn’t belong because it doesn’t begin with /b/ 5 Pillars of Reading: 1. Phonemic Awareness 2. Phonics 3. Fluency 4. Vocabulary 5. Comprehension Phoneme blending: Putting sounds together to make words; Teacher: “What word is /b/ /i/ /g/?” Student: /b/ /i/ /g/ is big. Sight words: Words memorized because they are so common; words students see often so they commit to memory
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Phoneme deletion: Take away a sound to make a new word; Teacher: “What is smile without the /s/?” Student: “Smile without the /s/ is mile.” Word Bank: Collection of words child recognizes in isolation. Phoneme addition: Adding a sound to make a new word; Teacher: “What word do you have if you add /s/ to the beginning of park?” Student: Spark. Word Recognition Process : Instantly identifying words as wholes, without resorting to analyzing words letter by letter and blending sounds to access an approximate pronunciation. Overgeneralization: extending the application of a rule to items that are excluded from it in the language norm, as when a child uses the regular past tense verb ending -ed of forms like I walked to produce forms like *I goed or *I rided. Telegraphic Speech : Two word sentences; EX: “Mommy go; Baby up; Doggy run, Doggy food”
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