A few of my learners just get on and do the whatever work I give them Some seem

A few of my learners just get on and do the whatever

This preview shows page 149 - 151 out of 286 pages.

mathematics itself that is the issue. A few of my learners just get on and do the whatever work I give them. Some seem habitually naughty. And most of them seem to follow one of the two extremes. So sometimes I can get the whole class working productively and sometimes the whole class just seems to get out of control following the lead of the naughty ones.” “I know what you mean,” remarks Millicent, “I try to focus on publicly rewarding good behaviour and dealing with discipline problems as soon as possible on a one-to-one basis. Otherwise the whole class starts to focus on your attempts to sort out discipline problems instead of on the maths. On a one-to- one basis it’s often possible to work out why learners are being ‘naughty’. Sometimes they just crave the attention they don’t get at home;
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139 sometimes something has happened to them on their way to school; sometimes there are real learning difficulties that result in frustration rather than any deliberate attempt to disrupt the class.” “Yes,” replies Jackson, “that is what Brigitte Th ompson of Positive Behaviour Management also says. I have read about her recently in the newspaper. She advocates tracking learners’ behaviour over time and notes that often the kids with discipline problems are intelligent, perceptive and have strong personalities. She argues that if we recognise and reward their good behaviour we can often help them become more positive leaders in the classroom.” “That’s all very well,” remarks Bobo, “but sometimes the kids do get a bit out of control.” “But that’s only because we let them,” says Jackson. “Thompson suggests that if all else fails, her five-step corrective plan should kick in. The first step is to issue a reminder when the first rule is breached. The second breach requires the teacher to ask the child why he or she is not making good choices. The third step involves getting them to fill out a journal, explaining their behaviour and exploring what they could have done instead. The fourth step is to contact the child’s parents and establish possible factors a t home. The fifth breach requires the intervention of the head of department or the principal. I’ve tried it and it works quite well. I have needed to involve my HoD only once so far this year.” “Yes,” adds Millicent, “I’ve found that it is only a few lear ners who habitually seem to have problems that result in disruptive behaviour and I’ve also found that I have much fewer discipline problems when I can get them interested in what they are doing in class.” Think about the following:
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  • Spring '19
  • Ways of Seeing, Mathematics education, teacher of mathematics, Caps, Department of Mathematics Education

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