For most cakes for most cookies the conventional cake

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What type of mixing method is used for most cookies? For most cakes? For most cookies, the conventional cake method is used. For cakes: conventional (most common), conventional sponge, pastry blend, single-stage, and muffin 5) Define the following terms from Chapter 23: a. shortened cake: a cake made with fat b. unshortened cake: a cake made without added fat c. chiffon cake: a cake made with fat and an egg white foam that combines characteristics found in both shortened and unshortened cakes d. gluten: the protein portion of wheat flour with the elastic characteristics necessary for the structure of most baked products e. cream of tartar: a white, crystalline, acidic compound obtained as a byproduct of wine fermentation and chiefly used in baking powder Chapter 25 & 26: Candy, Chocolate, and Frozen Desserts 6) What are the main ingredients of candy? Granulated sugars (sucrose) and corn syrup 2 of 5
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7) What factors determine the type of candy produced? Syrup and fat phase (whether a simple syrup or fat such as peanut butter is used), or crystalline vs noncrystalline/amorphous. The differences are how the mixture is combined and/or manipulated 8) What is the difference between crystalline and amorphous candies and list examples of each? Crystalline candies are candies in which the sugar is present in the form of crystals, such as chocolate, creams, fudge, fondant, marshmallows, divinity, etc. Noncrystalline candies are those in which the sugar is present in an uncrystallized form, such as hard candy, caramel, toffee, brittles, and gummy candies. 9) Describe how candy is produced (describe the steps) and important factors controlling crystal size. Candy is generally made in 4 steps: creating a syrup solution, concentrating contents of mixture via heating and evaporation, cooling, and beating or leaving undisturbed. The
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  • Summer '17
  • Tracy Grgich
  • Crystal, ice cream

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