Finally after the courts dismissal of his mild

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citizens, and for benefactors of Athens, as a city and as a state. Finally, after the court’s dismissal of his mild punishment at the Pyrtaneum, Socrates considers imprisonment and banishment , before settling upon a punishment fine of 100 drachmae . Given his poverty, this was a minor punishment compared to the death penalty proposed by the prosecutors, and encouraged by the judges of the trial. In defence of Socrates, his supporters increased the amount of money to pay as a fine, from 100 to 3,000 drachmae; nonetheless, to the judges of the trial of Socrates, a pecuniary fine was insufficient punishment for the philosopher Socrates, the social gadfly of Classical Athens . Part three: The judgement of the court [ edit ] In the Trial of Socrates, the judgement of the court was death for Socrates; most of the jurors voted for the death penalty ( Apology 38c), yet Plato provides no jury-vote numbers in the text of the Apology of Socrates ; but Diogenes Laërtius reports that 360 jurors voted for the death penalty and 140 jurors voted for a pecuniary fine for Socrates (2.42). [13] Moreover, the politically provocative language and irreverent tone of Socrates’s self-defence speech angered the jurors and invited their punishment of him. [14] Socrates responds to the death-penalty verdict by first addressing the jurors who voted for his death. He says that their condemnation of him resulted not from a lack of arguments, but from a lack of time — and an unwillingness to pander for pity, as expected of a man condemned to death. Socrates repeats that the prospect of death does not absolve him from following the path of goodness and truth. He prophesies that younger and harsher critics shall follow in his stead, philosophers who will spur ethical conduct from the citizens of Athens, in a manner more vexing than that of Socrates (39d). To the jurors who voted to acquit him, Socrates gives encouragement: his supernatural daimonion did not interfere with his conduct of the legal defence, which he viewed as a sign that such a defence was the correct action. In that way, the daimonion communicated to Socrates that death might be a good thing; either death is annihilation (release from earthly worry) and not to be feared, or death is migration (higher plane of existence) in which reside the souls of personages and heroes, such as Hesiod and Homer and Odysseus . Socrates concludes his self-defence by saying to the court that he bears no ill-will, neither towards his accusers — Lycon, Anytus, and Meletus — nor the jurors. He asks that they ensure the well-being of his three sons, so that they learn to live ethically.

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