Again planning is critical draft your questions and

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Again, planning is critical. Draft your questions and then test them out on your friends and see if you get the type of answers you’re looking for. Then refine and test again. 6. Ask your question slowly and clearly You want people to understand you the first time. To make sure you get the phrasing right during the presentation, write the question out in full on a small card and read your question from the card if you need to. Quiz show hosts do this and so can you. You could also write the question on a slide so that people can read it for themselves and ponder on it. 7. Make it easy for people to answer Many people avoid answering questions because it means speaking in front of a group a.k.a. public speaking. So you need to make it easy for them. There are a number of ways of doing this: 1. Have them talk to their neighbor about their answer to the question. Only then ask for their answers. This is an incredibly effective technique. It gives people a little more time to think in a non-pressurized situation. They get to checkout their answer and get feedback that it’s not totally stupid. And thirdly they get to rehearse answering the question. All of this has them be more comfortable answering out loud in front of the rest of the group. 2. Split your audience into small groups (2-4 people) to discuss the question. Then ask for one person from each group to summarize the answers from that group. The spokesperson is just reporting back so there isn’t the same fear of looking stupid with a wrong answer. Less confident people won’t have to speak in front of the group but will still have been able to take part in the discussion. 3. Hand out post-it notes and ask people to write their answer on the post-it and then come and stick it on the wall. 4. Ask people to write their answer on a flip chart at the front of the room. 5. This next method requires you to have some space in your room. Ask people to stand and move to the space. Create an imaginary line across the space by walking along the line. Let them know you’ll be asking a question and you’ll want them to
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answer by moving to a spot on the imaginary line. For example, I use this technique for people to see the level of presenting experience in the room. I’ll stand at one end of the line and say “Stand here if you’ve got lots of experience presenting”, then I’ll walk down the line to about the half-way spot and say “Stand here if you’ve got some experience” and then down to the other end and say “Stand here if you’ve hardly ever done it before.” 8. Wait for answers If you simply ask a question and want people to volunteer answers in front of the group you need to wait for the answers. Most people won’t answer straight away. They need time to think. Expect this. Wait in a relaxed but expectant stance. Look softly at different people in your audience. Normally someone will speak. Wait at least 10 seconds. Yes, this will feel like an eternity to you.
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  • Summer '18
  • dalal
  • Speed reading, Scholar Base

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