The belief in Manitou was common to Algonquian peoples Different tribes had

The belief in manitou was common to algonquian

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The belief in Manitou was common to Algonquian peoples. Different tribes had different mythologies and legends, with varying supernatural beings. Some of these beings were heroes or guardian spirits, such as Manibozho (or Manabush), the Great Hare, who, according to the Chippewa and other Great Lakes peoples, remade the world after bad spirits destroyed it with a flood. Others were demons, such as windigos of the northern forests who, according to the Montagnais and other Subarctic peoples, ate people. Although Algonquian tribes had varying rituals and festivals, they all celebrated with singing, drumming, and dancing. Some rituals had to do with hunting; others, such as the Green Corn Festival, related to farming; others concerned peacemaking or warfare; others were to cure illness; still others were for rites of passage, such as a boy passing into manhood.
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As a rite of passage into adulthood, both boys and girls were sent into the woods to fast and pray for a vision. If the child were fortunate, a spirit, usually in the form of an animal, would come to promise protection and give the child his or her own special identity. For a fuller sense of the Algonquian culture and history, see those tribes indicated earlier as having their own entries.
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  • Fall '15
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  • History, Great Lakes, Algonquian languages, Algonquian peoples, Algonquians, Subarctic Algonquians

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