Oppression discrimination and violence have always

Info icon This preview shows pages 2–5. Sign up to view the full content.

oppression, discrimination, and violence, have always been a representation of larger societal attitudes towards black women’s status in society. Beverly Guy Sheftall also mentions this in “Forty Years of Women’s Studies”, as she discusses in great detail how the experiences of women in the educational field and in the workplace are not just ‘part and parcel’ to being an active woman in modern society, it is also reflects the attitudes that society held at the time towards women in the workplace.
Image of page 2

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

There is also undeniably a personal genesis for black feminism, that is, the political realization that comes from the seemingly personal experiences of individual black women's lives. Black feminists and many more black women who do not define themselves as feminists have all experienced sexual oppression as a constant factor in our day-to-day existence. This focusing upon our own oppression is embodied in the concept of identity politics. We believe that the most profound and potentially the most radical politics come directly out of our own identity, as opposed to working to end somebody else's oppression. In the case of black women this is a particularly repugnant, dangerous, threatening, and therefore revolutionary concept because it is obvious from looking at all the political movements that have preceded us that anyone is more worthy of liberation than ourselves. We reject pedestals, queenhood, and walking ten paces behind. To be recognized as human, levelly human, is enough. A political contribution that we feel we have already made is the expansion of the feminist principle that the personal is political. In our consciousness-raising sessions, for example, we have in many ways gone beyond white women's revelations because we are dealing with the implications of race and class as well as sex. Even our black women's style of talking/testifying in black language about what we have experienced has a resonance that is both cultural and political. We have spent a great deal of energy delving into the cultural and experiential nature of our oppression out of necessity because none of these matters have ever been looked at before. No one before has ever examined the multilayered texture of black women's lives.
Image of page 3
Vivian Mays “Intersectionality,” provides 9 critical practices that offer “a vision of future possibilities that can be more fully realized once a shift toward the multiple takes place.” Why is this “shift toward the multiple” (i.e., intersectionality) critical to the field of Women’s and Gender Studies and feminism? Using practice 1 (Considering lived experience as a criterion of meaning), 3 (Employing “both/and” thinking and centering multiracial feminist theorizing), and 7 (Challenging false universals and highlighting omissions built into the social order and intellectual practices) specifically, discuss how other historical figures, theories, feminists, and/or course readings replicated or employed these 3 practices.
Image of page 4

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern