Figure 219 assumes that generally a given part can be stored in different ways

Figure 219 assumes that generally a given part can be

This preview shows page 15 - 17 out of 43 pages.

Figure 2.19 assumes that, generally, a given part can be stored in different ways (i.e., different storage forms), for example, on palettes or stacked on a shelf. Storage locations are usually broken up into storage places that allow certain types of storage forms. 2.1.4 Dealing with Missing Data In describing the MRP master data, we have assumed that either these data already exist or the organization possesses all information Part (1, ) (0, ) is a or Inhouse part Purchased part Supply structure Conditions Supplier (0, ) (0, ) Fig. 2.18 ERM connecting parts and suppliers 2.1 Master Data for MRP 33
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needed to create the data. This assumption is usually satisfied when the organization is similar to the type described in the beginning of the chapter: producing a standard production pro- gram in mass or large-series production based on well-defined product structures and well- known demand curves and stocking the products. Whenever customers are directly involved, the situation can be very different. In make-to- order production , the end products are often not predefined, but specified by the customer. For these products, the company will usually not have master data, unless the product has been built in the same way before. In individual make-to-order production , and especially in individual one-time production , the part and product structure data often have to be created just for the specific customer order. This does not necessarily mean that every single part going into a customer-specific end product has to be designed from scratch. Make- to-order manufacturers also strive to use standard parts as much as possible, because it is more economical. A typical situation is therefore that the higher levels of a product structure exhibit new (i.e., customer-specific) parts, whereas on the lower levels, standard parts are found. For standard parts, master data exist, but for customer-specific parts, this is not the case. Normally, an ERP system will require the company to create complete master data before any planning based on these data can be done. However, many make-to-order manufacturers are reluctant to make the effort of establishing new parts and product structures because their organi- zation requires elaborate administrative processes for introducing (and approving) new parts. On the other hand, an ERP system cannot do any planning without the underlying data structures. Therefore, at least some of the data have to be entered in one way or another. The ERP system can support this work effectively by providing adequate assisting features, including: Powerful copying and editing functions allow- ing existing part or product structure data to be copied and modified to suit the present needs Temporary parts and product structures which do not have to meet the same requirements as other database objects Product structures which reference incomplete part master data Planning features that exploit similarity (i.e., planning in analogy to previous similar orders) Part Assigned to (1, ) Storage form Storage place Storage location (0, ) Assigned to (1, ) (1, )
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