In a small company like Fastfit this knowledge sharing does not require much in

In a small company like fastfit this knowledge

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In a small company, like Fastfit, this knowledge sharing does not require much in the way of IT but larger, global organizations might employ a Web site (a.k.a. a knowledge portal) for sharing such DSS-generated reports. More About Knowledge Management The first thing to point out is that knowledge management processes focus foremost on people - not data, and on the harnessing of the organization’s intellectual property (IP). This intellectual property comes in two forms – explicit or recorded knowledge and tacit or the knowledge carried around in the minds of individual employees. While DS systems manage bodies of data, KM systems facilitate access to the artifacts of explicit knowledge, such as books, articles, drawings, memos, reports, blogs, wikis, discussion forum contributions, e-mails and instant messages, and the connections between those who know (a.k.a. internal experts; lead practitioners) and those who need to know. Anyone who has used a library or a document archive is familiar with the longest standing form of a KMS. The custodians of these documents and publications organize and index them for the retrieval and use of others. In the age of the Worldwide Web, many libraries have moved online and their holdings have been digitized, enabling remote access to organizational knowledge. Most enterprises now maintain some version of a web site (a.k.a. knowledge portal) expressly devoted to the collection, dissemination and exchange of explicit knowledge. Often referred to as Intranets, these web sites disintermediate the storage, management and distribution process, and reduce the need for brick-and-mortar libraries and knowledge management custodians. Instead end users often post and index their own content for peer review and sharing via the Web. And the librarian/archivist is supplanted by the search engine as the preferred mechanism for locating particular knowledge artifacts. The former custodians of the artifacts now spend their time selecting and maintaining knowledge management platforms – like portals – and in defining the standards for artifact collection, validation, and indexing (a.k.a. cataloging). Though the management of explicit knowledge poses challenges, these pale in comparison to the difficulties associated with the identification and sharing of tacit knowledge. In the first place, the body of tacit knowledge within any enterprise is vast. It is simply not practical to think that all critical knowledge in such a setting can or should be captured in a tangible form. Indeed, most seekers would very much prefer an interview with the source of the knowledge (a.k.a. the “expert.”) so that the process of sharing may be tailored to the inquirer’s specific requirements, and time and resource constraints. For that matter the disbursed, often-global nature of the 21 st Century enterprise makes it extremely difficult for an individual to even identify, yet alone obtain timely and ready access to the right person to address a particular knowledge need. And even if one
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