Are we having fun yet heres another animation you can

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Are we having fun yet? Here’s another animation you can play around with. When you open this link you will see three coloured spheres. Clearly the yellow one is the Sun and it can’t be moved. The blue circle is Earth and it can be dragged around to different positions. The grey circle is the Moon and it can also be dragged around. So, place the Earth a fair distance from the Sun and then move the Moon around the Earth in a fairly tight circle. When the Moon is between the Sun and Earth you are simulating a solar eclipse (see below). If you adjust the distance between the Moon and Earth such that just the bottom of the cone shadow intercepts the surface of the Earth then you have things adjusted properly so you can see what a solar eclipse looks like from Earth. If you are within that little dot on Earth’s surface you will see the solar eclipse; otherwise, you wouldn’t observe anything special. This is why people travel to different parts of the Earth to get into the path of the Moon’s shadow. On the other hand, if you move the Moon to the other side of the Earth you will be simulating a lunar eclipse, especially if you move the Moon completely into the Earth’s shadow (where anyone who can see the Moon can see the eclipse taking place). Enjoy! Solar Eclipse
We talk about solar eclipses here (in this lesson about the Moon) because solar eclipses involve the Moon. Solar eclipses also occur when the Sun, Earth, and Moon lie along a straight line (or nearly so). However, in this case it is the Moon that is in the middle. In other words, a solar eclipse occurs when the Earth passes through the Moon's shadow or when the Sun, Moon and Earth are lined up in that order. As with a lunar eclipse, the nodes of the Moon's orbit must be nearly aligned with the Sun and Earth. Clearly, the phase of the Moon must be new. If you are fortunate to be in the path of a solar eclipse you will have a rare and moving experience. You must take the precaution of not looking directly at the Sun (ever, as a matter of fact) during the entire eclipse cycle; otherwise, you will probably become blind. The entire show takes place over a two-hour period. First the Moon begins to cross in front of the Sun and appears to take a bite out of the Sun. As the size of the bite grows slowly we get to the point where the Moon has almost covered the Sun and it gets very dark, almost the same as night time with no birds singing and automatic lights coming on. The Moon completely covers the Sun because of an accident of orbital mechanics – the size of the Moon and the size of its orbit are just right to allow the Moon to have the same angular size for us earthlings (more about this below). Sometimes, because of lunar mountains, and sunlight breaking through the mountain ranges a spectacular “diamond ring effect” is displayed (shown here). Totality lasts for just a few minutes and then the opposite happens

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