A day in the life of an enterprise architect

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A Day in the life of an Enterprise Architect (d=printer).aspx?f=... 7 of 19 5/30/2016 8:52 AM
Figure 6. Using Microsoft Office tools in Enterprise Architecture efforts (Click on the picture for a larger image) In this very high level scenario, you could be working on an enterprise effort where you are capturing the current state of your enterprise or a project effort. You can create Microsoft Word templates that are used for capturing architectures. By doing so, you have defined elements that are consumable by a downstream process for consumption and workflow. Many processes can be developed from this once the data is in a consumable format. You have created a level of consistency in how you document architectures, making it easier to leverage information that has been documented when making IT decisions. By centralizing the information, you have created a repository for all of your architecture information. This facilitates governance functions, such as security, policy management, information management, approvals, and alerts. Reporting and metrics are a downstream benefit that can be used after all the information is classified. How They Make Decisions Decisions made by Enterprise Architects are complex and span multiple domains. EAs are not only pulled into multiple directions but are also required to switch between levels of detail as well. It is common to go from macro to micro and back again between meetings. When making architecture decisions, either on a project level or enterprise level, there are always many factors that go into the decision-making process. At times, it consists of a set of compromises to support a more important factor. A Day in the life of an Enterprise Architect (d=printer).aspx?f=... 8 of 19 5/30/2016 8:52 AM
Figure 7. Architecture trade-offs (Click on the picture for a larger image) As shown in Figure 7, the organizational factors can be significant in how technology decisions are made. In figure 8, you can see that there are three major classifications of the separation of decision making that is asked of an EA. Depending on your organizational structure, these may look a little different. However, each one of these is important for EAs to advise on. Figure 8. Three major classifications of the separation of decision making (Click on the picture for a larger image) Organizational Policy Policies that span the organization are often used to facilitate IT governance. By defining a set of policies or rules, the organization is aware of which technology practices are right for their organization. When the time comes to do a formal review, the IT community will also know what will be the basis of their evaluation. A Day in the life of an Enterprise Architect (d=printer).aspx?f=...

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