Strategize While knowledge probably makes up most of what you score on your

Strategize while knowledge probably makes up most of

This preview shows page 177 - 179 out of 229 pages.

Strategize While knowledge probably makes up most of what you score on your exam, you still need to take a step back and realize that this is a timed exam. You don’t only have to show what you know; you also have to be able to answer quickly enough to get through the exam. This is where test taking strategy comes in. The strategy does not necessarily apply to the moment you are taking the test, but also all the time leading up to your exam. Most pre-test strategies have already been covered above. You have to set up a schedule and stick to it so that you can cover all the material necessary to get your 5 on test day. This means setting aside hours each day, or even figuring out if you want to sit down and study for hours on end or study in smaller blocks throughout the day. All of these strategies have to do with what your personal needs are and your capacity to study. The Study Guides and Strategies website can help you in your test preparation.
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How to Study for AP Macroeconomics Cont. 178 Interested in an Albert license? E-mail us at [email protected] Probably the most important aspect of a test preparation strategy is working in such a way that you minimize stress and anxiety. The main problem with test taking is the stress that mounts in the months and days leading up to the exam. This can drastically interfere with your learning capacity and your ability to study efficiently. You will also have to make a strategy that you can use on the day of the exam. Remember that you only have a little over a minute per question on the multiple choice exam. The best part of the exam is that you can jump back and forth on the test to answer questions. If you find yourself caught on hard question, immediately skip it and come back to it. Doing the easiest questions first means you are saving time for the harder questions. For example, if you are taking only 20 seconds to read and answer easy questions, you are stacking up a surplus of 40 seconds per easy question that you can utilize to think about a harder question. This extra time really piles up over the course of the exam. The free-response questions come with their own strategy. The primary cause of a badly answered free response question is the lack of organization. You have 70 minutes to answer your questions. While most people think that the free response questions take a long time to answer, it does not have to be that way. The best strategy is to plan ahead. When you first read your question, take a moment to consider it. You can use the provided scrap piece of paper to formulate the answer. Outline the topics as asked in the question and jot down the main point of your answer. After you have an outline, move on to answer the questions in an organized manner. This method of planning will help you save time and offer a coherent answer that will help your grader get a grasp of what you want to say.
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