16 pilot information faa determined the newly hired

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1.6 Pilot information FAA determined the newly hired (one year) pilot possessed a commercial multiengine instrument rating. The pilot had a total of 300 hours, 50 hours in twins with 15 hours in Piper Aircraft and PA-31-310 “Navajo" of the mishap aircraft. The pilot had 5 hours of actual instrument meteorological condition (IMC) flight time. He had completed three flights with the principle company, Zonk Air, all day light, VFR sightseeing tours. Prior to working at Zonk Air, the pilot was employed in Arizona, flying a light twin, Part 91, for a solar panel company. Prior to that, the pilot received multi-engine flight training from a FBO, called “Super Pilot” based in Arizona, but it is no longer in business. Prior to the mishap, the pilot had not flown for Zonk Air in over 10 days. In addition, the pilot, on return from the mishap flight would be 2 days over his “grace” period for a Part 135-check ride. However, due to a lack of pilots, and urgency of the flight, management told the pilot to take the flight.Aircraft Accident Report Project1.7 Company information and operationsAccident Case Number ERAU-330RL
ZONK AIR ACCIDENT 8The FAA determined the operator of this aircraft was “Zonk Air Charters” based in Oxnard, CA. Zonk Air operates three aircraft, a PA-31 (mishap aircraft) and two 1979 Cessna 310s. Most of the charter business is related to scenic flights, etc. The company is certified for Part 135 and Part 91 operations. There are six part-time pilots, the owner, and secretarial staff. Maintenance is contracted out to another operation on the field. Zonk Air has had no accidents inthe past, but has been cited by the FAA for “failure to maintain proper records in accordance CFR 135 operations.” Training and flight proficiency were accomplished by the owner/operator who is a designated Part 135 check airman. Pilots are called in to fly; they do the pre-flight, file aflight plan, obtain weather, load the passengers, and execute the mission. Maintenance of the aircraft is contracted out to various vendors. A review of maintenance records indicated some aircraft logs are incomplete and lacking some sign-offs. Pilot records were noted to be incomplete and often showed no dates of the 135 check rides or line checks though personal logbooks of some pilots did reflect such information. There were no records to indicate that the pilot had attended any formal flight training from a recognized and certified flight safety trainingcompany. It was determined that Zonk Air had been up for sale for two years and was delinquent in paying fuel bills and maintenance inspections. The company was in the process of filing for Chapter 11, bankruptcy protection. Zonk Air had no formal dispatching or flight monitoring system, but does have an operations manual stating the need for such requirements. There was no documentation to show pilots received any human factors training or a company manual or procedures for an SMS program. Currently, there is some FAA ambiguity on what constitutes an SMS program for small operations. Though SMS is highly recommended, specific Aircraft Accident Report Project1.7 Company information and operationsAccident Case Number ERAU-330RL
ZONK AIR ACCIDENT 9mandated procedures have not been totally adopted and placed into rules. The general theme

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