4 c there are beers near the driver and the driver

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4. c) “There are beers near the driver” and “The driver was in a serious car accident.” These claims fit with the images described in the passage. See pp. 138–141, 151–156. 5. a) “The driver was drinking” and “This case of drinking and driving was dangerous.” Given the hidden premises identified above, these conclusions follow. See pp. 135–137, 151– 156. 6. a) HP1 HC1 + HP2 HC2 HMC When drawing diagrams, it is crucial to correctly locate linked and convergent premises and determine the logical relationships between premises and conclusions. See pp. 107–130 (Chapter 5). Passage 9 1. a) Yes. It is an ad, and ads are usually arguments. See pp. 143–149. 2. a) The text (“Fossil fuels are the only hope for a better future.”) suggests that it might be an argument. As this is a controversial point, it suggests that we are dealing with an argument. See pp. 143–145. 3. c) not hidden; it is “Fossil fuels are the only hope for a better future.” Just because an argument uses visual elements doesn’t imply that one of those elements contains a hidden conclusion. Sometimes, particularly in ads, the words are used to identify the main conclusion, and the images are used to provide support for it. See pp. 135–137, 151–156.
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Good Reasoning Matters! A Constructive Approach to Critical Thinking , Fifth Edition © Oxford University Press Canada, 2012 4. a) “Technological improvement requires fossil fuels” and “Technological improvement is the only hope for a better future.” The images, as described, suggest that the advertiser wants to link new technologies (smartphones, computers) to fossil fuel technologies (cars, pipelines), and all this to the “better future” of the slogan. These two premises would make that link. See pp. 138–141, 151–156. 5. c) There are no hidden conclusions. The hidden premises identified earlier are sufficient to establish the main conclusion, so no sub-conclusions are needed. See pp. 135–137, 151–156. 6. a) HP1 + HP2 MC When drawing diagrams, it is crucial to correctly locate linked and convergent premises and determine the logical relationships between premises and conclusions. See pp. 107–130 (Chapter 5).
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