E failure to act to prevent loss of life suffering

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i.e. failure to act to prevent loss of life, suffering, and deprivation that are in its power to prevent Might be objectionable to consider negligence as crime Includes failing to act to prevent international genocide, national disease epidemics, homelessness
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Theoretical Categories These categories are mostly artificial Serve to demonstrate the various types of illegal and unethical behavior a government may be involved with It is highly likely that a government will be involved in more than one if they are involved in one
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Notable Cases
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Cases Police corruption NYPD and the Knapp commission Watergate and Richard Nixon The Iran-Contra Affair Bureaucracy and the German Holocaust
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Police Crime Includes violating constitutional rights, excessive use of force, accepting bribes, etc. Abuse is often directed toward minorities, the poor, and political dissidents e.g. the race riots, Rodney King, the #Occupy crowd Historically, such abuses have been rarely prosecuted Police solidarity (i.e. the thin blue line) helps cover up crimes, including lying under oath and destroying evidence
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NYPD and corruption NYPD historically plagued by corruption Officers frequently committed perjury, searched without warrants, made false arrests, tampered with evidence Especially true of drug units Corruption became institutionalized within the department The bad apples or bad barrels argument Police culture is passed on as new officers are incorporated
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Knapp Commission Frank Serpico was the first officer to speak publically about wide-spread corruption As a result, the mayor of NY created a commission to investigate corruption in 1970 Known as the Knapp Commission Identified two types of corruption Grass eaters Meat eaters
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Aftermath Knapp’s final report was issued in 1972 Officers were moved to different divisions and department in attempt to break up corruption Stricter standards of investigation were adopted to prevent corruption Corruption still remains From 1992 to 2008, nearly 2,000 NYPD officers were arrested, according to annual reports by Internal Affairs Bureau An average of 119 a year.
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Watergate In Jan. 1972, five men were arrested for breaking and entering in the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters Investigation showed the burglars had been paid with money from a Nixon fundraising group After the break-in, broad abuse of power by the Nixon admin in attempt to cover- up their involvement followed
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Watergate By Oct. 1972, FBI reported that the Watergate break-in was part of massive spying and sabotage effort on behalf of the Nixon’s re-election campaign Nixon still won by the largest landslide in history Woodward and Bernstein reported cover-up attempts went deep into the CIA, FBI, and White House Nixon used the FBI to tap reporters phones, and the IRS to audit his “enemies”
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Watergate The burglars implicated Nixon’s aides, who were then fired One of the aides went on to testify
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  • Spring '14
  • AidaY.Hass
  • Richard Nixon, Contras, governmental crime

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